Tubular Tires

ArmyOfNone

Well-Known Member
From what I understand it is a right of passage to ride tubulars. I seem to be working my way into that realm.

The tufo prestige cross tires seem to do the job when it comes to the trails at this point. I have a good knowledge of cross tubulars or at least what the popular ones are.

I would like some help with tubular road tires. While I am excited about how much the can be a benefit, I fear being stranded not being able to make it home.


HELP!!!
 

BiknBen

Well-Known Member
I rode with Tubies on the road for a few years.

I tried the following tires:
-Conti Sprinters
-Vittoria Corsa CX
-Tufo S22 (?)

The Sprinter is a good all-rounder. Beefy enough for training but still adequate for racing.

The Vittoria offered the sweetest ride I have ever felt. It was a light tire with super supple thin casing. Every road felt like a baby's bottom.

The Tufo was another work horse tire.

Tufo makes a sealant that is similar to Stan's.
 

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warcricket

Like a Jerk
I would like some help with tubular road tires. While I am excited about how much the can be a benefit, I fear being stranded not being able to make it home.


yea, so what happens when u get a flat? are they sealant filled like tubeless tires?
 

Bike N Gear

Shop: Bike N Gear
Shop Keep
What is wrong with your clinchers? If you are looking for a softer ride, there are some really nice clinchers available these days.

If it is for a lighter, race only wheelset, go for it.

I used to ride tubulars (carried a spare). Didn't have a flat for years, then one morning before opening I managed to get two flats 7 miles apart. One roofing nail, one thumb tack. Just dumb luck. Pedaled back 11 miles to the shop on a flat front tire. Sold the wheels that day. Never looked back.

Clinchers have come a long way & tubes are cheap (and easy to carry & patch).
 

jimvreeland

Endurance Guy: Tolerates most of us.
yea, so what happens when u get a flat? are they sealant filled like tubeless tires?

I run Stan's in my CX tubulars. "MOST" of the time they'll seal just like tubeless MTB tires. I've flatted at 6-Mile and just needed to add a little CO2. Of course at P'Burg I ripped the sidewall, then you're done, but that's pretty much the case with any tire, clincher or tubular.

-Jim.
 

jdog

Shop: Halter's Cycles
Shop Keep
Look at at this:

http://smartbikeparts.com/search_details.php?itm=LU3400

It will inflate and seal the tire in one step.

You can also run stans sealant as a preventitve in a tubular tire:

"
Stops slow leaks and punctures. This Solution converts standard (non tubeless) tires to tubeless. Also works with any tubeless tire or tubular tires also works in road tubeless. When properly used, it will seal up to 1/4 inch punctures. The Solution can be used year round, even in sub freezing temperatures. It will not throw the tire out of balance like other sealants are known to do."

look up tubulars on Len Zinns page on Velonews.com

He was a big fan for a long time but recently he has peen pushing the tubeless road tires.

j
 

ArmyOfNone

Well-Known Member
These wheels fell in my lap. I have been wanting to try them for myself for quite some time now but was not ready do shell out the dough.

I dont like the idea of being stranded so I may just use them as a racing wheel. Its something I figure I should try. At the very least I can earn my merit badge and stick it on my vest. ;)
 

BiknBen

Well-Known Member
yea, so what happens when u get a flat? are they sealant filled like tubeless tires?

You carry a spare tubular TIRE in case a flat occurs. You pre-glue the tire so it is ready to go out on the road.

When a tubular tire is deflated, it is much easier to get off the rim. You put the spare on and ride home. I have done this. :(

Tufo makes a sealant that they recommend for their tires. The consistency is similar to Stan's. I used this for a year without a flat.

There are many pros and cons associated with Tubies. They were once preferred over clinchers. As clinchers improved over the years they have been favored because of their ease of use.

Tubular rims are lighter than a clincher rim. A tubular tire weighs about the same as a clincher tire/tube combo. It is also much easier to make a tubular rim out of carbon fiber. Therefore, a tubular carbon wheel is the choice for many racers who want an aero wheel while reducing weight.

The setup Fred got is an deep section, aluminum tubular rim. It's aero but heavy compared to other rims. OTOH, it may be ideal as a bomb-proof CX wheelset. Maybe we should call it "Fred-Proof". Well...how bout Fred Resistant? :rofl: I can't imagine a bike product that is Fred-Proof! :p
 
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ChrisG

Unapologetic Lifer for Rock and Roll
There's very little argument against tubulars for race wheels. I ran them for years on the road for races, but always have used clinchers for my training wheels.

As others have noted, the advent of tubeless clincher technology, as well as the improvements in clincher casings in general, has narrowed the performance gap somewhat.

Run them for races, Fred, and train on your clinchers.
 

ArmyOfNone

Well-Known Member
The setup Fred got is an deep section, aluminum tubular rim. It's aero but heavy compared to other rims. OTOH, it may be ideal as a bomb-proof CX wheelset. Maybe we should call it "Fred-Proof". Well...how bout Fred Resistant? :rofl: I can't imagine a bike product that is Fred-Proof! :p

:rofl: I certainly have put many products to the test. Many have passed, but some have failed. These wheels took a good beating yesterday and passed the test. However, I wont be pushing my luck with them. As light as that bike is I dont want to be hiking out of the woods with it on my shoulder.

We could have a sticker with my face! Quality control baby!
 
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