Hurricane Thread

walter

Fourth Party
I rode through Plainfield yesterday on my way and almost broke out in tears, shit is f'ed to the max.
Did you see the houses on Washington with the foundations blown out? I saw it this morning on my way out and couldnt believe my eyes.
 

JonFern

Formerly: send jon ferns
I worked in Cranford, Garwood, Clark area today. So much destruction of property. I feel terrible.
Rode over to my buddies place in Cranford today after the flood waters receded, and helped him with some basement cleanout. He got lucky, the water came within 6" of his 1st floor. He's a block in from the Rahway River and that entire area took a beating. Really sad seeing everyone emptying out their homes.

and there's this, also in Cranford:
 

jackx

Well-Known Member
What?

If the solar panels are underwater doesn't that also not bode well for the car itself?

An electric car sitting in traffic for a few hours uses relatively little electricity.

Waiting in line to charge your electric car battery? Have you never seen multi hour lines at gas stations before/during/after major storms?

I'm not suggesting that the current state of electric cars and charging infrastructure is going to be a solution for everyone currently but it seems like you just don't like electric cars and are somehow using the very specific case of people evacuating from a hurricane to attack the technology. If anything, the increasing frequency and severity of these storms makes the case for infrastructure investment in things like the electrical grid and, yes, solar panels to at least attempt to mitigate the worst effects of climate change.

I imagine most cars don't do well submerged or even in 2 feet of water.

Thats good that the electric cars don't use much power sitting in traffic. Not sure if that means the headlights and ventilation turn off too.

Think about how the people filling up in those multi hour lines at gas stations before/during/after major storms - probably only take 5-10 minutes to fill up or get their allotment - and how insane it would be if they had to wait 1 hour for each car in front of them to get a charge - if they weren't local and could not have charged their car at home.

Electric vehicles are a great option for people that want them. I would definitely seriously consider buying one if I lived in a city or had a short, regular commute. But I would always want to have a gas-powered car for when I want to be able to drive 360 miles to Buffalo or Montreal or Pittsburg without only having to figure out where I can get a recharge, and is it along my route.

With the recent storms I was pondering how the last thing people who want to evauate or out run a storm would want to worry about how far they can drive or sit in evacuation traffic before their car dies. And as I bike ride on local roads and hear the din of generators from tens of homes, I wonder if any of the people have an electric car that they need to charge at home to get food or go to work or anywhere else they need to go.

I hope battery storage and charging time for electric cars improves and the infrastructure.
 

shrpshtr325

Infinite Source of Sarcasm
Team MTBNJ Halter's
Rode over to my buddies place in Cranford today after the flood waters receded, and helped him with some basement cleanout. He got lucky, the water came within 6" of his 1st floor. He's a block in from the Rahway River and that entire area took a beating. Really sad seeing everyone emptying out their homes.

and there's this, also in Cranford:



This is one of my wife's family friends. Family almost didn't make it out
 

Ian F

Well-Known Member
I'm heading over to an old friend's house today to help with cleanup. Her basement was entirely submerged and they just got out of the house in chest-deep water. Unfortunately, they live in a known flood zone (house next to them was bought a demolished), so this is not a surprise. The house is eventually supposed to get a barrier around it (long story), but not sure now.
 

mtn

Well-Known Member
Honestly, how the death toll is around 30 is beyond me. IMO, double that would’ve been expected due to the severity in sub urban and urban areas. Darkness made some things worse, but apparently a daylight flood with people all over the roads would’ve compounded the issues.
 

Ian F

Well-Known Member
Unfortunately, you cannot underestimate the average person's stubborn need to get where they want to go without delay and will attempt to drive through moving flood waters. No matter how many times they are told not to.

Work can also be a driving factor. More than once I would attempt the 50 mile drive from Lower Bucks to the NJ office in Somerset, trying to find a way around various flooded roads - because if I stayed home due to weather, I had to use vacation time. Thankfully, WFH has pretty much negated that for me, but others are not as fortunate. During the last two big storms we had here, I worked through them almost oblivious to the chaos going on a few miles away - or in the case of that one big storm a couple of months ago that flooded houses near me - a few hundred yards away.
 

pooriggy

Well-Known Member
Team MTBNJ Halter's
Has @pooriggy checked in? I know hes in that area?
I made out OK. No water in my basement, my sump pump was pumping every 30" at the height of storm.

I'm always "sump pump aware", I've gotten water as a result of burnt out motor, loose fitting, power outage...

A lot of folks can get caught off guard if they've never owned a home during a flood, or it's easy to get complacent when the sump pump rarely has to work.
A sump pump may sit for 10yrs, rarely being needed, A pump sitting idle for 10 yrs can bite you on the ass when you need it.

Dealing with water in your house sucks. My sympathy goes out to those flooded out. It seems we're getting 100yr storms every 10 yrs lately.
 

walter

Fourth Party
I made out OK. No water in my basement, my sump pump was pumping every 30" at the height of storm.

I'm always "sump pump aware", I've gotten water as a result of burnt out motor, loose fitting, power outage...

A lot of folks can get caught off guard if they've never owned a home during a flood, or it's easy to get complacent when the sump pump rarely has to work.
A sump pump may sit for 10yrs, rarely being needed, A pump sitting idle for 10 yrs can bite you on the ass when you need it.

Dealing with water in your house sucks. My sympathy goes out to those flooded out. It seems we're getting 100yr storms every 10 yrs lately.
Glad to hear all is good for you, broski
 
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