2018 NJ Rando series

qclabrat

Well-Known Member
#1
Spoke some smack about this last year and never got it done
Not letting this slip by for another year, signed up for the Cranbury 200K on April 28th. This will be my longest ride ever, though I have done a few centuries and many metrics. Haven't been on the road since early Summer so time to get back into shape and build a bike, as I'm not planning to take the gravel bike. More to come...

http://www.njrando.com/home/2018-events
 
#10
I've wanted to try an Arrow ride for years. I have a riding buddy who would be a great teammate and is into trying one this year. We both have lots of long distance experience. If we could find another teammate I'd love to commit to some long team training rides, design a great route and give it a shot this year. I've brainstormed some scenic loops; perhaps starting near the end in Flemington, up to Bear Mt in NY, west to Old Mine Rd in NJ, down to the water gap, perhaps cross into PA for a stretch. Anyone into this? July 21-22?
 

jimvreeland

Shop: Hilltop Bicycles
Shop Keep
#11
I've wanted to try an Arrow ride for years. I have a riding buddy who would be a great teammate and is into trying one this year. We both have lots of long distance experience. If we could find another teammate I'd love to commit to some long team training rides, design a great route and give it a shot this year. I've brainstormed some scenic loops; perhaps starting near the end in Flemington, up to Bear Mt in NY, west to Old Mine Rd in NJ, down to the water gap, perhaps cross into PA for a stretch. Anyone into this? July 21-22?
I have a similar loop to this. I think I'm doing the MA600 that weekend though.
 

qclabrat

Well-Known Member
#15
I noticed some groups heading south along Ocean Ave. in Sea Bright/Monmouth Beach/Long Branch yesterday; I assumed they were folks doing the Cranbury 200K. Good to see.

I did about 90K, with a few efforts, and called it a day.
What time? I was slow and solo. That 10 mile stretch was the worst of the whole ride due to the strong head winds and the torturous noise off my helmet.
 

The Kalmyk

Well-Known Member
#17
What time? I was slow and solo. That 10 mile stretch was the worst of the whole ride due to the strong head winds and the torturous noise off my helmet.
This happened to me the first time I did this ride. The second time i did it I made sure I was with a group starting at Mt Mitchell.
 

qclabrat

Well-Known Member
#18
@qclabrat
Are your legs still attached?
Yeah, I survived but think I was DFL, haven't checked. Well, I caught up to this old french guy named Laurent on a Gitane at the last mile and didn't want to be a dick and pass him. Below is just a long winded account.

Night before over packed as for a 400K with extra lights, hi-vis vest, rain jacket, nutrition, sunscreen, etc. Each in their separate baggies to organize in a 30 year old Nashbar handlebar bag. This was my only option, as I couldn't figure how to make my cue sheet visible. The aerobars and the bag weren't going to coexist, so off went the bars. Arrived to the start (7am) in time, but my plan was to go off solo after everyone left, but with a few late riders rolling in, I didn't get out till 25 mins after. That was fine, still plenty of time, the goal was to finish within 10 hrs and they give you over 13 to finish. Jim does these in 7 so I'm on a very conservative pace.
IMG_20180429_220440.jpg


Since this was my longest ride to date and having only trained minimally (my longest recent ride was 40 miles as life got in the way), I thought to break up the ride into about 15 mile segments as mini goals. First control (30 miles) felt good, kept it at a conservative 15 mph and focused on a good cadence near 90. The multitude of turns and map checking (including wrong/missed turns a few times which the Garmin caught) sorta helped with passing the time. Caught up to about 3-4 riders at the first control. Bathroom break and equipment check and I was out before the others. About a mile down the road, while stopped at a light, the bike wouldn't roll when the light turned green but when I forced it, the tube blew out with a big bang. Off to the side of the road and I see the bead on the rear is slightly torn along with a shredded tube. The group that I met at the control passes while I change my tube. They ask if I'm okay, but I wave them to go on. I only packed a small pump and was only able to get in 20ish pounds, so much more rolling resistance till the next control. Compounding the building misery, my knee warmers for some reason wouldn't stay up and every few minutes were trying to pull them up.
IMG_20180428_101621.jpg


With the low pressure in the rear, I struggled a bit up the only climb on the course for an intermediate Control (45 miles), but luckily they had a pump. Two guys passed me on the climb, they apparently started about 5 mins after me. I only put in 60 psi fearing another blow out (riding 42mm rears with Max 80psi) and dropped the front to 60 as well. This turned out to be the wrong pressure as the downhills were squirrelly for the next 50 miles. I leave before the two who passed me at the hill (as one was having trouble with his powertap hub) but they pass me on the bridge which I thought we were to walk the bikes across. I might have misheard the instructions, maybe they said only across the metal sections, but did matter in the long run. The next 20 or so miles were about rough as it's ever been for me on a bike. First was finding a bike shop enroute, which I did in Sea Bright, for a spare inner tube, and would be a life saver later on. Unfortunately it took the guy about 10 mins to figure out how to factor in tax for a $7 tube and change for $10, though mentally it felt better than being on a bike. After battling those head winds and ears still ringing, I reach the Belmar control (65 miles) dejected. Guy at the control tells me I'm the final rider, because the guy behind me dropped. I get water, suck down a Gu and text my wife that I won't make it home for dinner. As I leave, the guy tells me the wind direction will change soon, so at least some encouraging news. Feeling pretty beaten, as the past 2 hours of riding, the mindfuck kept on telling me to quit and was only half way.
IMG_20180428_115316.jpg


Ten miles later, it got better as the route starting heading inland. The watermelon Gu (my favorite btw) started kicking in and I felt a second wind. Somewhere around 80 miles I get my second flat. Luckily I stopped for the new tube otherwise I'd be using the 2nd backup which is for a much narrower tire (23mm). Tire pressure was a little better than the last time, but not much more. I checked the rim carefully this time for sharp edges, and noticed a small ding, which was likely what previously caused the bead to unseat and the blowout (most roads were great, but some with nastly potholes). I ride very carefully for the next 15 miles to the last control (95 miles). I tell the guys there about my unlucky breaks and one gives me a back up tube just in case, narrow (32mm) but much wider than what I had. They also have a pump, which I eyed upon arriving. This time I only put in 50 psi with their suggestions, grab some water and I'm off again. Last leg and you would think it would fly by, but it was like watching the clock's second hand for the next few hours. I was getting a hang of reading the cue sheet and actually didn't get off track once on the way back. All day I was fight my mild dyslexia, of reading numbers, lefts/rights and remembering the next directions. Getting the first 5 miles to reach 100 was surprisingly difficult. Additionally, my ass also told me it had it enough as the pound of Chamois Butt'r was starting to wear off. The final 26 was not fun, but the prospect of having it over was enough to want me get back. As I approached the last 5 miles, storm clouds started to come in so I picked up the pace. At some point I even unclipped one shoe as the winds were rather strong and getting thrown sideways. As mentioned earlier, finished up with an older brevet veteran in DFL. No fanfare, but the pizza was good, though the beer was really bad.
IMG_20180428_192839.jpg


Surprisingly my neck and back held on okay. I've been doing some strength and core exercises it probably helped a bit. I think I'm done with the brevets this year, as I told myself at the start that if I didn't hate it, I'd at least try the 300K. Well, I kind of did hate it, mostly because I wasn't mentally prepared to ride for over 10 hours. Strava says my moving time was 10hrs 6mins but with the mechanicals and late start, roughly 12 hrs. Saddle time would be fine with better shorts and legs feel pretty good today. Even got up to do a 4 hour college walking tour then mowed the lawn (push mower) and blew out the leaves. Other things to note for next year. Start on time, prep the bike better for long rides (bags and mini clipboard), train mentally to go farther, CO2, sunscreen on knees and it's okay to ride with peers.
IMG_20180428_065927.jpg
 
Last edited:

Paul H

Fearless OOS Poser
#19
I really have nothing to compare to but if I did, it would be my rides with Liong. The final 10 miles were the toughest as I would be riding alone in the last stretch to get home where everything hurts.
 

The Kalmyk

Well-Known Member
#20
Yeah, I survived but think I was DFL, haven't checked. Well, I caught up to this old french guy named Laurent on a Gitane at the last mile and didn't want to be a dick and pass him. Below is just a long winded account.

Night before over packed as for a 400K with extra lights, hi-vis vest, rain jacket, nutrition, sunscreen, etc. Each in their separate baggies to organize in a 30 year old Nashbar handlebar bag. This was my only option, as I couldn't figure how to make my cue sheet visible. The aerobars and the bag weren't going to coexist, so off went the bars. Arrived to the start (7am) in time, but my plan was to go off solo after everyone left, but with a few late riders rolling in, I didn't get out till 25 mins after. That was fine, still plenty of time, the goal was to finish within 10 hrs and they give you over 13 to finish. Jim does these in 7 so I'm on a very conservative pace.
View attachment 68079

Since this was my longest ride to date and having only trained minimally (my longest recent ride was 40 miles as life got in the way), I thought to break up the ride into about 15 mile segments as mini goals. First control (30 miles) felt good, kept it at a conservative 15 mph and focused on a good cadence near 90. The multitude of turns and map checking (including wrong/missed turns a few times which the Garmin caught) sorta helped with passing the time. Caught up to about 3-4 riders at the first control. Bathroom break and equipment check and I was out before the others. About a mile down the road, while stopped at a light, the bike wouldn't roll when the light turned green but when I forced it, the tube blew out with a big bang. Off to the side of the road and I see the bead on the rear is slightly torn along with a shredded tube. The group that I met at the control passes while I change my tube. They ask if I'm okay, but I wave them to go on. I only packed a small pump and was only able to get in 20ish pounds, so much more rolling resistance till the next control. Compounding the building misery, my knee warmers for some reason wouldn't stay up and every few minutes were trying to pull them up.
View attachment 68083

With the low pressure in the rear, I struggled a bit up the only climb on the course for an intermediate Control (45 miles), but luckily they had a pump. Two guys passed me on the climb, they apparently started about 5 mins after me. I only put in 60 psi fearing another blow out (riding 42mm rears with Max 80psi) and dropped the front to 60 as well. This turned out to be the wrong pressure as the downhills were squirrelly for the next 50 miles. I leave before the two who passed me at the hill (as one was having trouble with his powertap hub) but they pass me on the bridge which I thought we were to walk the bikes across. I might have misheard the instructions, maybe they said only across the metal sections, but did matter in the long run. The next 20 or so miles were about rough as it's ever been for me on a bike. First was finding a bike shop enroute, which I did in Sea Bright, for a spare inner tube, and would be a life saver later on. Unfortunately it took the guy about 10 mins to figure out how to factor in tax for a $7 tube and change for $10, though mentally it felt better than being on a bike. After battling those head winds and ears still ringing, I reach the Belmar control (65 miles) dejected. Guy at the control tells me I'm the final rider, because the guy behind me dropped. I get water, suck down a Gu and text my wife that I won't make it home for dinner. As I leave, the guy tells me the wind direction will change soon, so at least some encouraging news. Feeling pretty beaten, as the past 2 hours of riding, the mindfuck kept on telling me to quit and was only half way.
View attachment 68081

Ten miles later, it got better as the route starting heading inland. The watermelon Gu (my favorite btw) started kicking in and I felt a second wind. Somewhere around 80 miles I get my second flat. Luckily I stopped for the new tube otherwise I'd be using the 2nd backup which is for a much narrower tire (23mm). Tire pressure was a little better than the last time, but not much more. I checked the rim carefully this time for sharp edges, and noticed a small ding, which was likely what previously caused the bead to unseat and the blowout (most roads were great, but some with nastly potholes). I ride very carefully for the next 15 miles to the last control (95 miles). I tell the guys there about my unlucky breaks and one gives me a back up tube just in case, narrow (32mm) but much wider than what I had. They also have a pump, which I eyed upon arriving. This time I only put in 50 psi with their suggestions, grab some water and I'm off again. Last leg and you would think it would fly by, but it was like watching the clock's second hand for the next few hours. I was getting a hang of reading the cue sheet and actually didn't get off track once on the way back. All day I was fight my mild dyslexia, of reading numbers, lefts/rights and remembering the next directions. Getting the first 5 miles to reach 100 was surprisingly difficult. Additionally, my ass also told me it had it enough as the pound of Chamois Butt'r was starting to wear off. The final 26 was not fun, but the prospect of having it over was enough to want me get back. As I approached the last 5 miles, storm clouds started to come in so I picked up the pace. At some point I even unclipped one shoe as the winds were rather strong and getting thrown sideways. As mentioned earlier, finished up with an older brevet veteran in DFL. No fanfare, but the pizza was good, though the beer was really bad.
View attachment 68082

Surprisingly my neck and back held on okay. I've been doing some strength and core exercises it probably helped a bit. I think I'm done with the brevets this year, as I told myself at the start that if I didn't hate it, I'd at least try the 300K. Well, I kind of did hate it, mostly because I wasn't mentally prepared to ride for over 10 hours. Strava says my moving time was 10hrs 6mins but with the mechanicals and late start, roughly 12 hrs. Saddle time would be fine with better shorts and legs feel pretty good today. Even got up to do a 4 hour college walking tour then mowed the lawn (push mower) and blew out the leaves. Other things to note for next year. Start on time, prep the bike better for long rides (bags and mini clipboard), train mentally to go farther, CO2, sunscreen on knees and it's okay to ride with peers.
View attachment 68080

Nigel is at the helm now? Nice.

As for over packing. Rando’s would justify it by saying: two is one and one is none.

Congrats on the finish