Science is looking up

Patrick

aka Fidodie
Staff member
Hubble doing hubble things.

http://www.gigapan.com/gigapans/215519

put the sucker in full screen and have at it.
read the text and try to conceptualize the numbers involved -

here is something that helps.
1 cubic meter is 1 billion cubic millimeters.
probably easier if you aren't from america.......wtf can't we suck it up and go metric?

look up what a statute mile is - vs a kilometer. one based on law and averages, one based on science (universal - like even on other planets it works)

well sort of - cause sea level pressure is terrestrial?
 
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Kaleidopete

Well-Known Member
June 4, 1931, William G. Swann became the first American to fly a rocket-propelled aircraft in Atlantic City,
Swann, who was a stunt pilot, attached twelve solid-fuel rocket motors to his high-winged glider.
In front of a crowd of 2,000 people, Swann ignited just one rocket. The glider, from a standing start, took off and flew
1,000 feet at an altitude of 200 feet. This stunt was performed in part to promote himself and to advertise the Steel Pier amusement park.

61819613_2216439561784525_237316588284411904_n.jpg
 

Kaleidopete

Well-Known Member
Last day of Spring / First day of Summer
ASTRONOMICAL SEASON VS. METEOROLOGICAL SEASON
The astronomical start of a season is based on the position of the Earth in relation to the Sun. More specifically, the start of each season is marked by either a solstice (for winter and summer) or an equinox (for spring and autumn). A solstice is when the Sun reaches the most southerly or northerly point in the sky, while an equinox is when the Sun passes over Earth’s equator. Because of leap years, the dates of the equinoxes and solstices can shift by a day or two over time, causing the start dates of the seasons to shift, too.

In contrast, the meteorological start of a season is based on the annual temperature cycle and the 12-month calendar. According to this definition, each season begins on the first of a particular month and lasts for three months: Spring begins on March 1, summer on June 1, autumn on September 1, and winter on December 1. Climate scientists and meteorologists created this definition to make it easier to keep records of the weather, since the start of each meteorological season doesn’t change from year to year.

Capture.JPG
 
Last day of Spring / First day of Summer
ASTRONOMICAL SEASON VS. METEOROLOGICAL SEASON
The astronomical start of a season is based on the position of the Earth in relation to the Sun. More specifically, the start of each season is marked by either a solstice (for winter and summer) or an equinox (for spring and autumn). A solstice is when the Sun reaches the most southerly or northerly point in the sky, while an equinox is when the Sun passes over Earth’s equator. Because of leap years, the dates of the equinoxes and solstices can shift by a day or two over time, causing the start dates of the seasons to shift, too.

In contrast, the meteorological start of a season is based on the annual temperature cycle and the 12-month calendar. According to this definition, each season begins on the first of a particular month and lasts for three months: Spring begins on March 1, summer on June 1, autumn on September 1, and winter on December 1. Climate scientists and meteorologists created this definition to make it easier to keep records of the weather, since the start of each meteorological season doesn’t change from year to year.

View attachment 97903
This needs to be modified for around here (i.e. stinkin NJ):

RAINY SEASON Jan 1 - July 31
DRY SEASON Aug 1 - Sept 30
RAINY SEASON Oct 1 - Dec 31
 

Patrick

aka Fidodie
Staff member
great spacex mission. booster landings, missed the main engine (fell off to the side), caught a nose faring for the first time.

24(?) satellite deployments -

impressive - they have changed up the production a bit, fewer people talking, less in the background, more status info.

i was impressed by the acceleration at the start 100km/sec^2 - in other words, for every second that went by, they were doing 100KM more,
so 10 seconds, 1000km/hr, 20 seconds 2000 km/hr (about 125 mph)

https://www.spacex.com/webcast
 
great spacex mission. booster landings, missed the main engine (fell off to the side), caught a nose faring for the first time.

24(?) satellite deployments -

impressive - they have changed up the production a bit, fewer people talking, less in the background, more status info.

i was impressed by the acceleration at the start 100km/sec^2 - in other words, for every second that went by, they were doing 100KM more,
so 10 seconds, 1000km/hr, 20 seconds 2000 km/hr (about 125 mph)

https://www.spacex.com/webcast
Going to have to catch one of these launches closer than 150 miles away