Fox RP23

J-Dro

Well-Known Member
Thats a good starting point, but there are many variables including your particular frame. Use a zip tie loosely wrapped around top of the the shock to measure the amount of sag. Just sit on the bike with your weight distributed as normally as possible (grip the handlebar like you are riding) but don't bounce around. Carefully get off the bike and measure the amount of travel by how much the zip tie moved. You should aim for ~25% sag. Then go out and ride for a bit. If you're not getting full travel, try a slightly lower pressure. Just a few psi can make a big difference. If you are bottoming out on the big hits, try a slightly higher pressure. It will probably take a ride or two to get the shock dialed in just the way you like it.
 
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DANSPANK

Guest
Pro pedal settings

Maybe it's just that my arse isn't tuned or something but can someone go into more detail about the 3 pro pedal settings and give instances for where each one works best? Yes, yes I should figure this out on the trail but I'm sure that one of you lot would love to demonstrate your mastery of this shock.

Ta loads!
 

pixychick

JORBA: Ringwood
JORBA.ORG
Sorry to hear no response on this one Dan, as I wonder too. I use mine in the middle and then just use pro pedal setting for racing or if I feel I can't keep up with you guys. It was explained to me that this option would allow you to have 3 groups of settings for 3 different types of terrain. Maybe like racing Ringwood and the flying out to race at Park City. When I raced Nationals, I used to adjust my suspension firmer for the smoother western terrain. Did it make a difference? not really. My best race was on the wrong bike with a loose head set. Go figure.

I say too much to think about and just go out and ride.;)
 

Norm

Mayor McCheese
Team MTBNJ Halter's
Dan,

10 pages of reading pleasure here:
http://www.mtbnj.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2849&highlight=propedal

Touches on a lot of things, including propedal. Post #24 really starts the adventure for me. Then after a lot of feedback, I put a puzling post out at #58, but then Maurice answers with some good feedback at #61 and ChrisG at #68. At #69 the plot thickens, and in #74 a start of a resolution. And then post #81 we come to a happy ending as noted in the 3rd paragraph. Mike gives some good feedback in there as well, as he's got the same bike as me. And I believe you also have an '06 Stumpjumper? So it's probably pretty pertinent to you as well if your question pertains to that bike.
 

Maurice

New Member
Maybe it's just that my arse isn't tuned or something but can someone go into more detail about the 3 pro pedal settings and give instances for where each one works best? Yes, yes I should figure this out on the trail but I'm sure that one of you lot would love to demonstrate your mastery of this shock.

Ta loads!

It depends on the bike and where you ride, but generally on the pro-pedal setting the different numbers pretty much correspond to more or less firmness, that is the threshold at which the shock starts working is increased or lowered. I think on 3 (or the other way around, I don't even look) you end up with almost a hardtail. On 1 it's a lot softer but still active (as in, you can stand and it eliminates some of the bobbing). 2 is sort of in-between.

On my race bike it's set to 2 and seems like a good compromise. Accelerates like a hardtail but still descends fast.

On the trail bike I almost never use pro-pedal, I set the lever to off and it works well for me. If the climb is technical enough it seems like suspension fully on is a little better. If it's not technical it doesn't matter for me.

Cheers,

Maurice
 

jbogner

NYCMTB: President
JORBA.ORG
Maurice is right on, Dan. I use the 3 (firmest propedal) setting as a sort of "lock out" when pedaling on pavement, long flats, or really long smooth climbs. On the trail, I generally leave propedal off completely.

I guess if I was racing some place smooth and fast, I'd dial in the propedal somewhere in-between and leave it on. But for regular trail riding on rocky trails, I don't use it. The VPP suspension design naturally uses chain tension to counteract pedal bob, so propedal is a bit redundant.
 

Maurice

New Member
Maurice is right on, Dan. I use the 3 (firmest propedal) setting as a sort of "lock out" when pedaling on pavement, long flats, or really long smooth climbs. On the trail, I generally leave propedal off completely.

I guess if I was racing some place smooth and fast, I'd dial in the propedal somewhere in-between and leave it on. But for regular trail riding on rocky trails, I don't use it. The VPP suspension design naturally uses chain tension to counteract pedal bob, so propedal is a bit redundant.

Interesting point about the VPP design, and I guess one of the reasons I never really loved it for climbing. The tension put on the chain needs to go somewhere, and that somewhere is your legs. I always felt my DW-link bike sluggish on climbs when they got technical. In that respect single-pivot bikes, or even hardtails, seem to grant you that extra kick you need to overcome the rock or root that will likely stall your progression and possibly generate a copious amount of profanity. I've also snapped chains a couple times that way, right in the middle of a technical climb. Probably just a coincidence but I haven't snapped a chain since I switched to the Yeti. Or I may just be getting weak.
 

mergs

Spokompton's Finest
JORBA.ORG
Like Maurice and Jamie I leave it the setting at 2 (but I might try 3, Jamie has me thinking...) for long climbs, but most of the time I leave it "open".

I started out messing with the dial, switching it around between 1, 2, and 3 and then a good friend, who's opinion I respect, told me "mergs, stop cheatin flip the pro-pedal to open, it'll make you a better rider". I don't know about "better" but it keeps me honest and I spend less time fiddling which I think is an achievement :)

Similar to Mo and Jamie, try and find a setting (by tinkering) that meets you long climb needs (about the only time you'll have the opp and time to flip it on) and then leave it at 1 , 2 or 3. I'd try 3 first. Then leave it.

Use the sag guidelines typical for your weight as the instructions indicate and then keep an eye on the rubber band, on a typical n. nj ride you should be using most of the travel, wo a total bottom out, with the lever open. that's what I've been told indicates you have a good pressure setup for your weight.

p.s. propedal and horst may be a little redundant too. I ride a Titus with a specialized/horst link so I can ride it open and the frame handles a lot of the things the pro pedal normally would. i love the shock.

sometimes I do set the propedal on and leave it on but its basically the same reason that I fail to remember to flip my fork lockout to off before the downhill. :)
 
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DANSPANK

Guest
Thanks for the responses guys. I knew I could count on you all!

Cheers, Lazy-arse Daniel.
 
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DANSPANK

Guest
Just a quick update on this. I tinkered like you all said but really couldn't tell the difference. I sent the shock back to fox and just gotit back yesterday after about a week. I haven't ridden yet but even in the garage I can tell the difference between off/on and the 3 propedal settings. So it would seem that my shock was fooked all along.

Ok, off to the trails (ahem) tonight with my new tyres and serviced shock - it's very exciting!
 

Jim & Val

Active Member
Dan, one point to remember is that you always want to check your sag with the ProPedal off and fully geared up to ride. Like one of the previous posters said, a small amount of air pressure change makes a big difference. Good luck!
 
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