What is the "Haro Mary SS 29er" of 2020's?

Pearl

THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING
Team MTBNJ Halter's
We are all one in the same, the guy/girl that everyone reaches out to about "what bike to get" or other bike advice from family members and co workers. Everyone is obviously blown away by the amount of money we would spend on bike tires, suspension forks, etc. It got me thinking,

What is the "entry level" mtb/road bike of choice now and days?

You can say I'm harping on the old days; that is fine. What is the go to recommendation for a new bike for an absolutely newbie?

In 2009, The Mary SS was $960 NEW.

I see Cannondale offers the Trail around the same price, is that the drug to push? Am I missing another brand/option?
 
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JonF

Well-Known Member
For a *legit* FS bike on a budget, the Ripley AF seems to be the hot ticket. $3K and you get a serious, progressive setup with a great suspension design and nice components.
 

a.s.

Well-Known Member
Newbies don’t know better. Might as well get the best.
E79206F8-6705-42BB-B4EC-FB1B2C3988F9.jpeg


Then you can buy it off them later for cheap. :p
 

ChrisG

Unapologetic Lifer for Rock and Roll
I certainly don't have my finger on the current pulse of the mtb market, but I'd steer an ambitious beginner toward something like a Salsa Timberjack, Kona Honzo, Santa Cruz Chameleon, or the rough equivalent from the bigger manufacturers. 27+ or 29 would both be viable choices for this user group, too.

Prices are not as heart attack-inducing as an FS bike, and modern geometry and gearing will go a long way toward enjoying riding immediately while still having lots of room to learn.
 

jShort

2018 Fantasy Football Toilet Bowl Lead Technician
Team MTBNJ Halter's
I’ve seen a ton of new riders on Ploygons. They seem like the goto for many.


 

serviceguy

Well-Known Member
We are all one in the same, the guy/girl that everyone reaches out to about "what bike to get" or other bike advice from family members and co workers. Everyone is obviously blown away by the amount of money we would spend on bike tires, suspension forks, etc. It got me thinking,

What is the "entry level" mtb/road bike of choice now and days?

You can say I'm harping on the old days; that is fine. What is the go to recommendation for a new bike for an absolutely newbie?

In 2009, The Mary SS was $960 NEW.

I see Cannondale offers the Trail around the same price, is that the drug to push? Am I missing another brand/option?
DO I really have to answer that?
 

extremedave

Well-Known Member
Team MTBNJ Halter's
The new Trek Roscoe is getting really good reviews. I like the way my Fathom works but there's enough annoying detail stuff for me to hesitate on recommending. Is this theoretical new rider looking in the $1k range or $3k? I'd help this person find a clean used bike but that's me.
 

stb222

Love Drunk
Jerk Squad
Honestly I don't think a "Mary" exists in today's environment. At that time, it seemed like every shop had a Mary. Maybe there was an ease of obtaining them? Or maybe it was ease distribution like QBP owning All City, Salsa and Surly (meaning every shop can get them).

Unfortunately, the online brands probably rule here. I have no idea what people are buying, but peep this:

$1,299
 

Pearl

THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING
Team MTBNJ Halter's
You used to recommend total noobs to buy a rigid singlespeed?
Not really, but for $500 (what I bought mine for) you can get into the game. What is the "get into the game" bike now? Are newbs really goign to spend $3k on a hobby the are unsure about?
 

JimN

Captain Wildcat
Team MTBNJ Halter's
What is the "get into the game" bike now? Are newbs really goign to spend $3k on a hobby the are unsure about?

Most probably buy a shitty hardtail and then either don't get into it, or they upgrade to something better. I spent like $2400 on my first bike, which I remember thinking was an insane amount of money, and more than I thought I'd ever spend on a bicycle. I justified it to myself by figuring that I would probably like mountain biking, I needed to do something for exercise, and if I spend an obscene amount of money on a bike then I'm less likely to let it collect dust in the garage. I obviously didn't know anything.
 

iman29

Well-Known Member
I certainly don't have my finger on the current pulse of the mtb market, but I'd steer an ambitious beginner toward something like a Salsa Timberjack, Kona Honzo, Santa Cruz Chameleon, or the rough equivalent from the bigger manufacturers. 27+ or 29 would both be viable choices for this user group, too.

Prices are not as heart attack-inducing as an FS bike, and modern geometry and gearing will go a long way toward enjoying riding immediately while still having lots of room to learn.
As an advanced beginner on a MTB I would tend to agree with this category recommendation. Yes its slightly above the $1000 price range but you get a decent amount of upgrades compared to the real entry level stuff like a Trek Marlin something for only a few hundred bucks more (guesstimate not facts).

**edit - new TJ are a bit more than $1000**

I may be biased but my TimberJack is such a great bike for me and my limited skill set (riding and repairing) and I do like the future option of 29 wheels if I choose.

For road bikes this seems to be getting more complicated since it seems the Aluminum Frame/ Rim brake/Carbon fork standard is fading out, plus everyone wants to know what does Gravel bike mean.

Pre-COVID inflation I would always tell family and friends to find something used and see how they like the sport before they go all in. If the price for a used bike is reasonable this is still my answer to prevent anyone from buying a NEXT or a Walgoose and then tell me how much riding bikes sucks.
 

cassinonorth

Well-Known Member
Most probably buy a shitty hardtail and then either don't get into it, or they upgrade to something better. I spent like $2400 on my first bike, which I remember thinking was an insane amount of money, and more than I thought I'd ever spend on a bicycle. I justified it to myself by figuring that I would probably like mountain biking, I needed to do something for exercise, and if I spend an obscene amount of money on a bike then I'm less likely to let it collect dust in the garage. I obviously didn't know anything.

Yeah, this is the unfortunate way many people get into the sport. Buy crappy $800 hardtail -> Go online to ask about how to convert to 1x or a better fork -> Get told it's not worth it -> Buy better bike.
 
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