What is a typical charge for a shop to lace up a new wheel?

TJYeti

Knows about bikes
#8
Why not lace it yourself? Couple YouTube vids should get you through it. Then take it to a shop for truing/tensioning as I would assume you don’t have those tools.
 

mbruno

Well-Known Member
Team MTBNJ Halter's
#9
Why not lace it yourself? Couple YouTube vids should get you through it. Then take it to a shop for truing/tensioning as I would assume you don’t have those tools.
Not to be a douche, but why spend the time lacing it if you're just going to drive to the shop to have them true and tension? I mean, drop off all the parts, walk away, come back, boom, Jim's built you some wheels.
 

TJYeti

Knows about bikes
#16
Not to be a douche, but why spend the time lacing it if you're just going to drive to the shop to have them true and tension? I mean, drop off all the parts, walk away, come back, boom, Jim's built you some wheels.
Because he might get some satisfaction out of at least lacing it himself and learn something in the process?
 

TJYeti

Knows about bikes
#17
If you tell them you just built them but don't know how to true, I think they charge double.
If a customer wanted to lace it themselves I was fine with and encouraged that. I was a one man show for a while so it saved me time. I would tell them I’d knock a few bucks off for that but if they did it wrong and I had to redo it I’d charge extra and let them decide. It was cool to see people proud that they’d done something themselves that they thought was voodoo before.
 

jimvreeland

Shop: Hilltop Bicycles
Shop Keep
#19
This is way lower than I thought tbh
It's on point with normal hourly shop rates. Most of the time shops are 80-100 an hour. It takes me 10-15 minutes to lace a wheel and another 10-15 to tension and true it. For normal metal wheels. So 40 -60 minutes. The other $20 is in picking out the correct spokes and such. Carbon takes 5-10 minutes longer for each step and internal nipples are another 5-10 minutes.

I also build over 1,000 wheels a year so this is probably on the fast side. Newbs might take over an hour per wheel.
 

jimvreeland

Shop: Hilltop Bicycles
Shop Keep
#20
If you tell them you just built them but don't know how to true, I think they charge double.
The truing usually isn't the part you need to worry about. If the spokes aren't prepped correctly it will be really difficult to get good tension. The prep needs to be wet for it to work. Once it dries out the nipples are hard to rotate. Especially because new wheel builders will usually use the multi colored Wheelsmith Prep and that stuff sucks.