tubeless pro/con

anrothar

entirely thrilled
what does everyone here think? i'm considering making the switch. is the weight of a stans system about equal to the weight of a tube? is it reliable? does the glue/goo break down in really wet muddy conditions? will i have to carry co2 as opposed to a pump?
 
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DANSPANK

Guest
I just bought the sealant to use in my tyres but couldn't even get the tyres to seat. I spent a whole afternoon trying to do it and ended up just getting sealant everywhere.

I also read about tyres burping air, especially when you bounce onto rocks and things. And I thought that the Northern NJ terrain, with it being so rocky, would encourage this action.

Combining the pain-in-the-arseness of seating the tyres, the mess, and the possibility of having to pump the tyres up or perhaps even insert a tube mid-ride, I'm sticking with tubes for now.

If you want to use the sealant I have to give it a blast without spending the coin then let me know and I'll bring it to a future group ride... I have the tubeless valves too.
 

anrothar

entirely thrilled
everyone i've spoken to using them hasn't had problems. i wonder if the problems on mtbr are cause by user error regarding impatient or improper install, or innappropriate rim/tire choice. stans has all the compatibility issues listed on the site... i think i'm gonna try it eventually.
 

walter

Fourth Party
Hey Sean, are these problems coming from making non tubeless wheels tubeless? Is that what you are trying to do? I dont think that these problems would come about on a tubeless specific wheelset. Not that I am suggesting you buy new wheels, and not that I have any exp. with any tubeless products.

Nevermind, I'm gonna go back outside with my daughter and play dollies.
 

anrothar

entirely thrilled
i haven't read any reviews of anything other than stans and the link scott posted. yeah, i am considering stans though. i like the width of my current rim, and don't know of any 29" tubeless rims of 28mm+ width...
 

ytc100

New Member
From what I've gathered you will save around 100g per wheel with the Stan's system on average.

What's your reasoning for wanting to make the change? For me I guess I am getting sick of the occasional pinch flat but I'm not sure if the potential installation and performance problems would be worth it. The thought of burping out half the air in my tire on the way down some rocky section of trail is a little nerve racking.
Plus $60 seems like a lot of money for two rim strips/valves and sealant.

A lot of reviews here:
http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/tubeless_tire/product_88679.shtml
 
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anrothar

entirely thrilled
i'm having the same thoughts scott. would be nice to be able to run lower pressure without worry of pinch flats. and no worry of puncture flats.
 

anrothar

entirely thrilled
think i just found my next rim.

i'm about to start drinking and doing housework at the same time.
 

Norm

Mayor McCheese
Team MTBNJ Halter's
You guys should get together and do the pain meds + drinking. Or house work and reading. Either way, mix it up, have fun.

I've recently started changing my tires pretty often which makes Stan's less of an option, or so I'm led to believe because once you get it on it's a PITA to get off?
 
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DANSPANK

Guest
I just got a puncture when I was out today. Having to gnaw he thorn out of the tyre and spending 10minutes inflating the tube again with a hand pump wass a pain in the bum - if only I'd been able to seat the bloody tyres!
 

pixychick

JORBA: Ringwood
JORBA.ORG
I find the stans stuff works pretty well. I have used it with tubeless rims and regular rims with the conversion strip. With both tubeless tires and regular tires.

When I did regular tires, I used the conversion strip for tight seal. They took 2 weeks to seal, and that was with leaving them off the bike and rocking them twice a day. Most people don't have the patience for that, but if you're really into weight saving, it can be done.

I have found that some tires are harder to get on and off. Not sure if it was old stans balls compromising the system. I try to clean them up when changing them now. Having some sort of compressor helps too. I can't always get it with just a pump.

IMO, the grippyness and traction you get, plus eliminating most pinch flats, out weighs any maintenance issues. I know I am setting myself up for a jinx, but I have only flatted once in the 4 years of using them, and that was a ripped sidewall on an old python light.

If you are looking to do it on a budget, I think the stans solution is some sort of artist (latex?)modeling solution deluted. A friend of mine makes his own and adds water, windex and a dash of slime.

Ride on flat free!
pixy
 

Jason

JORBA Board Member/Chapter Leader
JORBA.ORG
Been using UST for a few years now and not a single flat. I even gave it the old nail test on an old set of tires and it sealed right up and held. I don't really know about the weight but I also don't care very much about that either. Changing tires can be a tad bit messy and CO2 helps when you initially seat the tire but I use a regular floor pump the rest of the time.
 

ChrisG

Unapologetic Lifer for Rock and Roll
i'm having the same thoughts scott. would be nice to be able to run lower pressure without worry of pinch flats. and no worry of puncture flats.
I've been musing on this as well. I think that tubeless really has advantages in this realm, and it seems it would be a particular boon on a full rigid bike.

I currently run 35 psi, 2.3 Python front, 2.1 Bulldog rear. I'm chicken to go any lower running tubes.
 
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