thoughts on steel

bonefishjake

Strong like bull, smart like tractor
Team MTBNJ Halter's
stolen directly from the other forum. funny chit!

Well, it's steel, so of course it's good. Ninja swords were made from steel. So you know it kicks ass.

Things ninja swords were not made from:
-aluminum
-carbon fiber
-dead cats.

Other badass things made from steel:
-Guns
-Bombs
-Chuck Norris

Also steel is steely, as in steely eyed. So it gives you some good mojo, you can defeat your enemies with your demeanor.

In a pinch, steel can be magnetized, macgyver style, which might get you out of a fix if you had to turn your bike into a giant compass or something.

Also steel rusts, which is handy, because it's a good indicator when you need to buy a new bike. Since the only way a steel bike can be destroyed is by rust, and chromoly rusts really slowly, they last a long time. When the rust goes all the way through the tube, you know it's shot. Aluminum and carbon fiber don't do this, they just break, usually when you're riding down a volcano at 200 mph being chased by pirates who are mad at you for being a ninja.

Steel is real. Aluminum is real too, it just doesn't rhyme.
 
P

Phatbiker

Guest
i like steel. i rode lots of 4130 steel bikes as a bmx rat. some broke way before they rusted though. i have a steel single speed made out of dedaccai steel. one of my favorite road bikes was a viner made from columbus slx. steel can be made strong and steel can be made to be relatively low weight. a well made steel bike feels awesome. the problem with steel is that to get it just right you have to pay some bucks. blah, blah, blah.. nothing else to say..

phat

bonefishjake said:
stolen directly from the other forum. funny chit!

Well, it's steel, so of course it's good. Ninja swords were made from steel. So you know it kicks ass.

Things ninja swords were not made from:
-aluminum
-carbon fiber
-dead cats.

Other badass things made from steel:
-Guns
-Bombs
-Chuck Norris

Also steel is steely, as in steely eyed. So it gives you some good mojo, you can defeat your enemies with your demeanor.

In a pinch, steel can be magnetized, macgyver style, which might get you out of a fix if you had to turn your bike into a giant compass or something.

Also steel rusts, which is handy, because it's a good indicator when you need to buy a new bike. Since the only way a steel bike can be destroyed is by rust, and chromoly rusts really slowly, they last a long time. When the rust goes all the way through the tube, you know it's shot. Aluminum and carbon fiber don't do this, they just break, usually when you're riding down a volcano at 200 mph being chased by pirates who are mad at you for being a ninja.

Steel is real. Aluminum is real too, it just doesn't rhyme.
 

jdog

Shop: Halter's Cycles
Shop Keep
Stainless??

I remember reading that one of the major tubeset manufacturers was making a stainless tubeset this year.

This would get me back on a steel bike in a hurry.

I spoke with Rob Vandermark from Seven Cycles, who told me that he was riding an unpainted steel bike to see what the real world rust issues were with steel.

He said that it practiaclly saw no impact other than a discoloration.

The new steel tubesets have so much alloy blended in them that they are much less prone to environmental decay than people think. or so he said.

j
 

anrothar

entirely thrilled
i heard somewhere that stainless was more brittle than chromoly. could be wrong about that though.
 

Allamuchy Joe

Not White House Approved
JORBA.ORG
Stainless is a weaker material than carbon steels like 4130. So, a bike made from stainless would probably be heavier. You can get stronger stainless, but it would make the bike much more expensive.
 

jdog

Shop: Halter's Cycles
Shop Keep
This sounds pretty good..

Reynolds 953 : MAR-AGING STAINLESS STEEL

UTS : 110-127Tsi, 250-290 ksi
1750-2050 MPa

Reynolds latest innovation takes steel alloys into a new league. By utilising a specially developed martensitic-aging alloy stainless steel that can achieve ultimate tensile strength in excess of 2000MPa, this has a strength-to-weight ratio that can take on the best materials currently used in the industry. The resilient ride of steel, very high impact strength (similar to armour plating) and fatigue resistance combine to provide an extraordinary material that can now be used in butted tubing.

953 have been developed using material from Carpenter Speciality Alloys. The strength of this material can be customised by controlling the amount of cold-work and heat-treatment - this allows us to optimise strength and ductility to suit the applications in 953. Reynolds also offer highly stressed components like the butted bottom bracket shell and rear drop-outs in the 953 alloy, along with fittings to complete a frame based on a high-strength precipitation-hardening Carpenter alloy and other weldable stainless steels. More information on these materials can be found in our FAQ's in the 953 section, and technical comparisons are shown under Technology/Comparative Properties on our website.

Reynolds will work with frame fabricators to provide recommended production techniques, so that the challenges inherent in using an extremely hard metal can be overcome. With wall thickness down to 0.3mm, frame builders will be handling very thin walled tubing, and 'best practice' techniques are similar to those used in titanium frame welding. It will be possible to manufacture TIG welded, fillet-brazed and lugged frames using 953.

Benefits: Ultra-strong steel, with anti-corrosion features from a stainless steel. And the legendary ride of steel.


953 - THE AGE OF THE SUPERSTEEL.
 

ChrisG

Unapologetic Lifer for Rock and Roll
jdog said:
Reynolds 953 : MAR-AGING STAINLESS STEEL

UTS : 110-127Tsi, 250-290 ksi
1750-2050 MPa

Reynolds latest innovation takes steel alloys into a new league. By utilising a specially developed martensitic-aging alloy stainless steel that can achieve ultimate tensile strength in excess of 2000MPa, this has a strength-to-weight ratio that can take on the best materials currently used in the industry. The resilient ride of steel, very high impact strength (similar to armour plating) and fatigue resistance combine to provide an extraordinary material that can now be used in butted tubing.

953 have been developed using material from Carpenter Speciality Alloys. The strength of this material can be customised by controlling the amount of cold-work and heat-treatment - this allows us to optimise strength and ductility to suit the applications in 953. Reynolds also offer highly stressed components like the butted bottom bracket shell and rear drop-outs in the 953 alloy, along with fittings to complete a frame based on a high-strength precipitation-hardening Carpenter alloy and other weldable stainless steels. More information on these materials can be found in our FAQ's in the 953 section, and technical comparisons are shown under Technology/Comparative Properties on our website.

Reynolds will work with frame fabricators to provide recommended production techniques, so that the challenges inherent in using an extremely hard metal can be overcome. With wall thickness down to 0.3mm, frame builders will be handling very thin walled tubing, and 'best practice' techniques are similar to those used in titanium frame welding. It will be possible to manufacture TIG welded, fillet-brazed and lugged frames using 953.

Benefits: Ultra-strong steel, with anti-corrosion features from a stainless steel. And the legendary ride of steel.


953 - THE AGE OF THE SUPERSTEEL.
Check out www.waltworks.com for some discussion of this stuff.

Anybody remember Columbus Metax tubing? Stainless steel. Rhygin built some frames from it and most, if not all of them broke.

BTW, I'm a big fan of the steel too. Both of my one-gear bikes are magnetic, and I just bought a steel CX bike.
 
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