Snapped Water Bottle Cage Bolt

bucknejo

Active Member
I've snapped the head off a water bottle cage bolt and now the stem is severely lodged in the rivnut/frame. Any pro tips on extraction? Already thought of TNT but have ruled that out initially. Flame thrower is still in the running though.

I'm thinking Dremel with 2mm or so circular blade to create a slot for standard screwdriver. Anyone ever use these guys? Will this cut a slot in an aluminum bolt?

https://smile.amazon.com/ILOVETOOL-...9Y2xpY2tSZWRpcmVjdCZkb05vdExvZ0NsaWNrPXRydWU=

Screen Shot 2021-04-14 at 3.50.23 PM.png

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Last edited:

jklett

Well-Known Member
I've snapped the head off a water bottle cage bolt and now the stem is severely lodged in the rivnut/frame. Any pro tips on extraction? Already thought of TNT but have ruled that out initially. Flame thrower is still in the running though.

I'm thinking Dremel with 2mm or so circular blade to create a slot for standard screwdriver. Anyone ever use these guys? Will this cut a slot in an aluminum bolt?

https://smile.amazon.com/ILOVETOOL-...9Y2xpY2tSZWRpcmVjdCZkb05vdExvZ0NsaWNrPXRydWU=

View attachment 155761
Just use a regular cutoff in the dremel for a slot. Worst case, drill the head off the rivnut and put in a new one. You may even be able to get away with a well nut for a bottle cage if the other one is fine and you can't use a rivnut for some reason.
 

Karate Monkey

Well-Known Member
What are the circumstances? Did you do it removing it, or installing it? Is there any stub sticking up that you can grab with a small pair of needle nose vise-grips?

If you are cutting a slot, a diamond scribe (for engraving) works a bit better on something that small/close quarters. A flex extension is also nice, since there usually isn't room in a compact frame for a rotary tool.
 

KenS

JORBA: Director
JORBA.ORG
Match bolt size to ez out bit, drill proper sized hole, extract broken bolt with ez out, profit? Fire works too, and n+1 applies.
2LKN9_AS02.jpg
 

Karate Monkey

Well-Known Member
Rivnuts complicate using an ezout. RH bits tend to screw the stub IN to the frame.

If, on the other hand, you happen to have a drill that fits into the frame, a left hand bit works well (assuming it's a mild-steel screw). Use an automatic center punch, then drill the stub with a 1/8 left hand bit. They usually zip right out.
 

ekuhn

Well-Known Member
I find it tough to extract such small bolts. Hard to get a drill bit right down the center.
Then obviously a new bike is warranted.

Cut a slice across the bung and the broken bolt with a dremil. Then use a small headed screw driver to backout? It will score the bung (hey now!) but you should have no issue spinning a new one in.
 

Patrick

Overthinking the draft from the basement already
Staff member
Pictures - remaining bolt stem sits just below the opening.

View attachment 155803View attachment 155804

make a jig to center a bit (close to center) out of a piece of wood that will use the raised area to keep
the jig from moving - preventing a bit from skipping around.

out of curiosity, did it shear off tightening it, or trying to take it out, or from a hit?

should be no problem if AL (per OP) to drill/slot
 

bucknejo

Active Member
make a jig to center a bit (close to center) out of a piece of wood that will use the raised area to keep
the jig from moving - preventing a bit from skipping around.

out of curiosity, did it shear off tightening it, or trying to take it out, or from a hit?

should be no problem if AL (per OP) to drill/slot

sheared if off tightening, clearly not paying attention to as to why it was so difficult to torque a cage bolt.
 

Santapez

Well-Known Member
Team MTBNJ Halter's
What are the circumstances? Did you do it removing it, or installing it? Is there any stub sticking up that you can grab with a small pair of needle nose vise-grips?

If you are cutting a slot, a diamond scribe (for engraving) works a bit better on something that small/close quarters. A flex extension is also nice, since there usually isn't room in a compact frame for a rotary tool.
Rivnuts complicate using an ezout. RH bits tend to screw the stub IN to the frame.

If, on the other hand, you happen to have a drill that fits into the frame, a left hand bit works well (assuming it's a mild-steel screw). Use an automatic center punch, then drill the stub with a 1/8 left hand bit. They usually zip right out.
This is the correct advise.

If it's just overtightened and not seized, a left-hand drill bit will probably catch it and unscrew it.
 
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