Road Shoes Versus Winter Shoes

Norm

Mayor McCheese
Team MTBNJ Halter's
Like everyone else, I'm really looking forward to spring. But one thing I'm not looking forward to is getting rid of the Lake shoes. They are so damn comfortable I find myself keeping them on even when I know it's going to be up over 50 degrees. My feet don't mind. In fact, they love it. They're the most comfortable shoes I've ever worn on any bike, by a mile.

So...what makes the Lake shoes so comfortable? Can any road shoe be that comfortable? If so, how? Do I just need to drop the money on a really good road shoe? Insoles? Sacrifice a chicken? What's the secret?
 

stb222

Love Drunk
Jerk Squad
I have thought about this also and I think it is the thick insole of the Lakes. if you have taken them out, you will notice they have a bubble/air layer which make then cushie. Also, the boa closure avoid pressure point pretty well and the leather upper is nice and supple.
Specialized shoe have the different insoles to better match you personal preferences and also address foot angle issue inside the shoe instead o externally. I have only read about these and I think Manny mentioned that he has them, although he seems to be sold on the whole specialized thing. :D

I switched back to my road shoes and pedals on Friday. Insole is noticeably less cushy but for me, the engagement of the road cleat/pedals just blows spds out of the water and was a welcome change.
 

jimvreeland

Endurance Guy: Tolerates most of us.
Be Cinderella and find the perfect fitting glass slipper!! Specs and features mean nothing, what brand one person likes over another means nothing, shoes are like saddles and tires, you need to try them and find your match!!

-Jim.
 

THATmanMANNY

Well-Known Member
I have only read about these and I think Manny mentioned that he has them, although he seems to be sold on the whole specialized thing. :D...
:eek: now time to go oogle at my new road shoes and wear them on the bike I didn't start yet :rolleyes:
 

ArmyOfNone

Well-Known Member
Sounds weird maybe but winter shoes are not as stiff as your road shoes, the rigidity of the shoe might effect what your feeling as well.

I avoided this issue by only riding in my winter shoes in the woods. I wore road shoes all winter. :getsome:
 

RNG1

Well-Known Member
Be Cinderella and find the perfect fitting glass slipper!! Specs and features mean nothing, what brand one person likes over another means nothing, shoes are like saddles and tires, you need to try them and find your match!!

-Jim.

I agree with this, when I bought road shoes I immediately started trying on the more expensive ones so that I could gage against what is the "best" it turned out that when I put the mid level Spuink on they just felt and fit perfect even though the bottom is some super hard plastic and not carbon like the pricier ones. Also comfort on feet are funny, last season I replaced my god knows how old specialized mtn shoes and went for Sidis (again not the priciest ones) but even though they were way better than the specialized until I experimented by pulling out the inner sole from these and put them in the sidis they just felt funny. I think our feet notice subtle change like our teeth do.
 

jdog

Shop: Halter's Cycles
Shop Keep
Sounds weird maybe but winter shoes are not as stiff as your road shoes, the rigidity of the shoe might effect what your feeling as well.

I avoided this issue by only riding in my winter shoes in the woods. I wore road shoes all winter. :getsome:

Wedges??
 

Norm

Mayor McCheese
Team MTBNJ Halter's
I avoided this issue by only riding in my winter shoes in the woods. I wore road shoes all winter. :getsome:

This is like saying I choose not to pull out the splinter in my big toe because I don't want to know what it's like to ride without it.

A lot of shoes feel good when you put them on. It's only after an hour or 2 they start to not feel as good anymore. I've considered taking the Lake insoles and sticking them in the road shoe to see how it feels.
 

Cyclopath

Shop Owner / Employee
Shop Keep
I've spent consecutive 8hr days in my Specialized shoes and never noticed I was wearing shoes at all.

The Bellweather shorts... I was VERY well aware of those:cry:
 

pixychick

JORBA: Ringwood
JORBA.ORG
Those Lakes are not as stiff as road shoes. Depending on what kind of foot you have, comfort and transfer of energy can be improved with well fitted foot bed. I use custom foot beds in all my shoes except the Lakes. I consider the Lakes my least comfortable and sloppiest shoe. I only wear them in the woods. I use a stiff atb shoe one size too big on the road in the winter. I go back to road shoes and road cleats when I take my snow tires off the car. Just yesterday, mr pixy was riding behind me and complaining about my left knee wiggle. Once I'm back in my zero float, custom aligned road cleats, my knee hammers straight up and down. Why? I have no idea.

Specialized makes a non-custom foot bed system designed by Any Pruit, but I have not tried it. They look nice.
 
Last edited:

Maurice

New Member
Man, you must never have tried Sids on. They might as well make them in the shape of monkeys or teddy bears, they feel so comfortable. There's no shame in wearing MTB shoes on the road either, in fact they're the same shoes, different sole.

And winter shoes above 50? Do wild hogs come running when you crack them open? ;)
 

Norm

Mayor McCheese
Team MTBNJ Halter's
I use custom foot beds in all my shoes except the Lakes. I consider the Lakes my least comfortable and sloppiest shoe.

...

Specialized makes a non-custom foot bed system designed by Any Pruit, but I have not tried it. They look nice.

Where do you get custom foot beds? I'm very interested.

Man, you must never have tried Sids on. They might as well make them in the shape of monkeys or teddy bears, they feel so comfortable. There's no shame in wearing MTB shoes on the road either, in fact they're the same shoes, different sole.

And winter shoes above 50? Do wild hogs come running when you crack them open? ;)

Nope, never tried Sidis on, which I will do for sure. My Lakes are actually the mtb version with spds. I don't feel any hot spots at all but the road shoes I get them. So I have something mixed up there.

No wild hogs yet :)
 

Cyclopath

Shop Owner / Employee
Shop Keep
The liner in the Specialized shoes has built in support for the long arch, the metatarsal arch and a full heel balancing cup. All these things mold to your foot and stabilize it, reducing movement and minimizing the tendency of those areas and arches to tire, stretch and flatten out.

Though it may seem minimal, if the foot loses its stability in the shoe it will affect the ankle, the leg and the knee leaving them all to loose stability. Like Pixy, that simple arch and the balance of the shoes keeps my knee from rocking all around. And with a very irritable torn meniscus, I would not be able to ride without it.

If you look at the footbed of your shoe and it's completely flat, your foot has no choice but to flatten and conform to it. If you look at the Specialized insole you'll see a rounded heel and arch that looks similar to your foot. Very simply, a molded insole helps keep your foot molded.

Now, the best kind of insole is a custom insole, molded to your own foot, that can be moved from shoe to shoe. It will address any instability areas in your foot and will balance them properly to align everything from your feet straight up your legs and spine. You can get fitted for them from a trusted podiatrist or possibly an orthopedic maybe a chiropractor. They may run a couple hundred dollars but might be partially covered by insurance.

Custom IS the best way to go but in the absence of that, the Specialized insole runs a close second.
 

pixychick

JORBA: Ringwood
JORBA.ORG
Hey Norm, the guy who did mine, worked out of Get Outside bike shop and has since moved out of NJ. Some ski shops do them as well, but they may require differnt materials for a bike shoe. I'll ask around and post up if I find any others.
 

pixychick

JORBA: Ringwood
JORBA.ORG
ok, just got some info: another non-custom foot bed maker for cyclist:
http://www.esoles.com/products/cycling.aspx

According to a foot bed maker, esoles seem to be spending a lot of time on design for cycling shoes, if you should choose to try that first. Non-custom should run around $40 and is worth a try. They fit most people. The tricky part is properly trimming them to the shoe. Some shoes heel cups don't line the foot bed up to the best position.

Specialized is another option . I believe Marty's carries specialized.

Skibarn in Paramus, and Ridgewood Cycle do custom foot beds. They will run closer to $150. and up. You may need to check your local shop to see if they do them as well. A Dr may not be needed unless you have serious problems.

Another website here that describes the difference:
http://www.rocket7.com/footbeds.htm
 

Norm

Mayor McCheese
Team MTBNJ Halter's
Wow, fantastic info. I'm certainly going to look further into this as I'd love for my summer shoes to be as comfy as my winter shoes. Good stuff, much appreciated.
 
Top