Is training everyday harmful?

scotth

Well-Known Member
I started to run 1.5 miles in the mourning and wanted to get a bike ride in there too. If I run the 1.5 miles and then the next mourning rode 7.5 miles could this be to much for a beginner to training? I was planning on rotating one day run and the next day ride. This is mostly to build endurance. Most people I talk to that run, run more than 1.5 miles, I would like to start off slow with the running though. Also today was the first time running outside, I used to run on a treadmill down in my basement. Much better time outside. Thanks for any information.

Scott
 

Norm

Mayor McCheese
Team MTBNJ Halter's
The abbreviated version of the long answer is, it depends.

The short answer is, yes. Training every day for a beginner is going to be too much. I know someone is going to say that running 15-20 minutes isn't much. But if you're really a beginner you should ease yourself into anything. Whatever your goal is, it's not going to happen this week. Nor is it going to happen this year. If you do it right, this is something you'll be doing for years to come. When you get to that point, it will not have been because you started out training 7 days a week. It will be because you chose a path of exercise that was maintainable over time.

IMO, just stick with 5 days a week now, and increasing the 1.5 and 7.5 miles. I also think you should focus more on time, not miles. Work on increasing your time spent doing anything, be it running or biking. After a while, you can up to 6 days a week if you really feel up to it. But 5 is plenty to make a difference.
 

jimvreeland

Endurance Guy: Tolerates most of us.
I just wrote a huge thing and then realized you said "running".

I can no longer reply to this...

-Jim.
 

jimvreeland

Endurance Guy: Tolerates most of us.
Here, I'll just add this. Running and cycling fitness are unrelated. It doesn't make sense I know. I know plenty of super-fit-extremely strong runners who get absolutely smoked on the bike. In the end, if you want to get faster on the bike, you need to be on the bike. Be the ball, be the ball, ah nan nan nan nan nah:D

-Jim.
 

graveyardman67

Well-Known Member
Team MTBNJ Halter's
The real question is what are you "training" for. Just run and ride to get in shape or do you have a goal?

Training to get in shape vs. training to compete are going to be different.

Throw some upper body in there a day or two and give the legs a rest.
 

BiknBen

Well-Known Member
Most people I talk to that run, run more than 1.5 miles, I would like to start off slow with the running though.

I just did my first run of the season. 2 miles in about 20 minutes. You have to start somewhere. In the last 4-5 years, I have begun running around this time of the season. I work up to roughly 6 miles in an hour. I'm no speed demon on foot. I do a 10k Turkey Trot each Thanksgiving Day.

As JimV pointed out, there is no correlation between running and cycling. When I transition to running, I suck. When I change my focus back to cycling I have gotten no better.

I'm an exercise junky. :rolleyes:
 

scotth

Well-Known Member
My first two races were at Ringwood & Jungle Habitat, I couldn't believe how fast I lost my wind. I would like to build more endurance, and also do some races. I feel like any place I walked the bike I could have rode if I had the energy and my lungs wern't on fire. I'm going to run one day then ride about 7 or 8 miles the next. I'll do this for a while and see how I feel. This will all be between 5&6am. Thank you for all the good advice so far:)


Regards,
Scott
 

walter

Fourth Party
Scott, keep in mind also where you do your normal rides. If you are a regular of places like 6 mile or Allaire you are bound to get beat up at places like JH and Ringwood. Try mixing up where you ride to give you a little more terrain variety. If you are riding CR, take the couple extra minutes(ok, 30 extra) and try Lewis Morris. The race loop there is well marked and its got some good elevation.
 
J

jhollens

Guest
To run or not to run ?

Scott, I think I'm in a similar situation, just started racing the H2H series this year and am also trying to increase my fitness level by running and biking. I've also entered a few local 5k's and a 5 mile running races this year.

For me, I feel that alternating between running and cycling adds variety. I think I would exercise less and burnout if I rode every day and didn't mix things up. For now, I'm gonna continue to do both. When the 2009 H2H series comes around, maybe I'll focus more on cycling.

How about lifting for the legs (Squats etc... for cycling) Is it productive ? Are allot of MTB racers hitting the weights ?


thanks,
jim
 

walter

Fourth Party
How about lifting for the legs (Squats etc... for cycling) Is it productive ? Are allot of MTB racers hitting the weights ?


thanks,
jim

I *think* most will say to keep the weight training for the legs to a minimum and concentrate more on core and upper body workouts. To much lifting in the legs and you burn yourself out for the ride.
 

xc62701

Well-Known Member
I just did my first run of the season. 2 miles in about 20 minutes. You have to start somewhere. In the last 4-5 years, I have begun running around this time of the season. I work up to roughly 6 miles in an hour. I'm no speed demon on foot. I do a 10k Turkey Trot each Thanksgiving Day.

As JimV pointed out, there is no correlation between running and cycling. When I transition to running, I suck. When I change my focus back to cycling I have gotten no better.

I'm an exercise junky. :rolleyes:

Instead of that you should join in on the Turkey day Wawayanda Ride...
 

bobkennelly

Member
I just did my first run of the season. 2 miles in about 20 minutes. You have to start somewhere. In the last 4-5 years, I have begun running around this time of the season. I work up to roughly 6 miles in an hour. I'm no speed demon on foot. I do a 10k Turkey Trot each Thanksgiving Day.

As JimV pointed out, there is no correlation between running and cycling. When I transition to running, I suck. When I change my focus back to cycling I have gotten no better.

I'm an exercise junky. :rolleyes:

I think doing as many different activities can only help you, using different muscle groups can only help your general fitness. Too much of one thing might lead to over use injuries..just my opinion.
 

mattybfat

The Opinion Police
Team MTBNJ Halter's
core workouts are just as important as saddle time,but if time is limited try to do some intervals, start on flats then move up to slight grades, this will give you explosivness needed. I believe if your a xc racer all your training should be on a bike be it road or mountian. my2cents
 

kush

Active Member
To answer your question, it depends on dozens of factors like intensity, frequency, duration, your medical condition, age, etc.

Bottom line - if you're really serious about training for a goal (like racing) vs. casually getting in better shape to ride socially, I suggest you read (lots) and from that create a structured regimen.

Everyone has a different approach, and you need to find one that works for you and scales with your ability over time.

Ned Overend's book, "Mountain Bike Like a Champion" is one I heard good things about

Another, more technical at times but is very popular is Friel's Training Bible http://www.amazon.com/Mountain-Bikers-Training-Bible/dp/1884737714/ref=sr_1_8?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1223559523&sr=1-8
 

RacerChick

Hudson Valley Girl
Little late ...

My first two races were at Ringwood & Jungle Habitat, I couldn't believe how fast I lost my wind. I would like to build more endurance, and also do some races. I feel like any place I walked the bike I could have rode if I had the energy and my lungs wern't on fire. I'm going to run one day then ride about 7 or 8 miles the next. I'll do this for a while and see how I feel. This will all be between 5&6am. Thank you for all the good advice so far:)


Regards,
Scott

Scott, you need to do "Base Miles" to achieve endurance with your heartrate in zones 2-3 (approx. 125-145 bpm) A beginner needs endurance first. Trust me I've been there. Running is good for cross training, but like Jim V said won't do much for cycling.

R to the C :D
 
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