Idiot's Guide to the H2H series?

betta285

New Member
hey guys,

I'm really excited about next season and the prospect of racing, but I'm entirely clueless about the whole process. I've scoured the H2H website and it usually leaves me a bit confused and I figure you guys know what's going on. How do I register or sign up? Do i have to be a jorba member? What class would I start off in? How long and/or difficult are the courses usually? I'm sure I'll have more questions later. Thanks in advance, guys.

Jim
 

warcricket

Like a Jerk
hey guys,

I'm really excited about next season and the prospect of racing, but I'm entirely clueless about the whole process. I've scoured the H2H website and it usually leaves me a bit confused and I figure you guys know what's going on. How do I register or sign up? Do i have to be a jorba member? What class would I start off in? How long and/or difficult are the courses usually? I'm sure I'll have more questions later. Thanks in advance, guys.

Jim

you sign up on bikereg.com either in advance or day of at the venue.

start in beginner if it's your first race. beginner's should expect to race circa 7 miles, sport ~14, and expert ~21.

you don't need to be a JORBA member.

You will have to purchase a $5 one day usa cycling licence for each race if you do not have the annual license.
 

BiknBen

Well-Known Member
Each race is individually promoted by different clubs. Each one will set up some type of on-line registration in the months before the event. You can also register at the event but will pay a small surcharge.

You do not need to be a member of any organization. The races are sanctioned by USA Cycling and follow their rules. You can buy a USAC license for the year for $50ish. You can also pay a $5 fee at each race for what is called a One-Day license.

The category/age group format is changing next year. Beginners start at Category 3 and earn their way to Category 2 and then 1. An experienced rider who is new to racing, may choose to start in Category 2. That can often be a very humbling experience to someone who has no racing experience. ;)

Each category is divided again by age. Each age group will start with a time gap between them. So all the Cat3 racers will be one the course together. Each age group is timed/scored separately. Once the race begins it is common for age groups to overlap each other on the course.

The race courses are often about 6-9 miles long. In general, the cat 3 group will do one lap. The next group will do 2 laps and so on. This is entirely up to the promoter so it can vary. The courses will combine some fire roads and singletrack riding. Difficulty will depend on the venue.

More questions? Bring 'em on!!!
 

NJ-XC-Justin

KY-DH-Freddy
there are beginner courses that are 12 miles long. usually the easier terrain, lewis morris or stewart, but still, that's a good distance for a beginner. wawayanda, blue and ringwood are difficult races, but they're all worth it. races are a great experience and great people.
 

Ironjunk

Member
If you consider yourself fitter than average, just do a cat 2 race (assuming cat 2 has the sport people in it). Last year i did my first race beginner at kittatinny and after I was done i was pretty tired but still wanted more time on the course. I got first, not bragging, i found out when the results were posted a couple days later.

You can get a real scope about how good you are in the sport class.
 

betta285

New Member
Thanks for all the info guys.
I doubt I'm much more in shape than the average starting racer, so I'll probably just start at Cat3.

Jim
 
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BiknBen

Well-Known Member
Thanks for all the info guys.
I doubt I'm much more in shape than the average starting racer, so I'll probably just start at Cat2.

Jim

If you've never witnessed a race, I'd suggest you start in the Cat3s. Folks can ride pretty fast when you put a number on the front of their bike.
 

NJ-XC-Justin

KY-DH-Freddy
I strongly advise starting in Cat3 (beginner) for your first race. If you do well, move up. Like Ben said, it can really suck to get beaten by a half hour.
 

chemgirl

Well-Known Member
I suggest you start in Cat 3, you can always move up. I started in Cat 2 and regret it because I can't move down. If you are going to race, you should get the enjoyment of winning at least once in your 'career'. If you kick ass in a few Cat 3, then move on up.
 

Panhead

Well-Known Member
If you are going to race, you should get the enjoyment of winning at least once in your 'career'. If you kick ass in a few Cat 3, then move on up.

Sandbaggers are worse than finishing a half hour behind everyone else, though
 

chemgirl

Well-Known Member
Sandbaggers are worse than finishing a half hour behind everyone else, though


Oh I absolutely agree......I never paid attention to the mens results, but look at the time spreads for the womens results, there's almost an hour time difference betweent the first and last racer at many races.

The only reason I went straight to Cat 2 instead of Cat 3 was the money/time factor. If I'm going to pay for a race and drive 2 hrs to get there (and remember the price of gas last summer -ugh), I wanted to ride for more than 7 or 8 miles. I don't think sandbaggin would have been an issue, at least with me.
 

antgold

Member
question - in a race - do you have an opportunity to ride the race loop before starting racing ?
or part of the game is how you good on handling an unknown trail ?:confused:
 

BiknBen

Well-Known Member
question - in a race - do you have an opportunity to ride the race loop before starting racing ?
or part of the game is how you good on handling an unknown trail ?:confused:

Pre-riding is encouraged. Courses are usually marked the afternoon\evening before the race date. In some cases, promoters have provided maps or marked the course in advance. That is becoming more common but not to be expected.

The race course is always open before the first race begins. Most course will remain open for pre-riding while races are in progress. It is understood that those pre-riding the course will not interfere with those who are racing. In some cases, you are not allowed on the course unless you are racing. I have seen this on very short courses but it is rare.

Those that have pre-ridden certainly have an advantage. How much of an advantage depends on how difficult the course is.
 

RacerChick

Hudson Valley Girl
Running with the big dogs ...


Agreed :p Thinking your in shape for a weekend ride is one thing, being in race shape is another story. Racing with the Cat2 Men your first race could get ugly.:drooling: One rider comes to mind who in his first MTB race did race the Cat2's and took 1st. Than Jim "The Animal" Vreeland moved up to Cat1. One good way to tell if you can keep the pace of Cat2's is do a hammerfest group ride and if you can hang on, there's your answer. After watching a few cyclocross races, I thought to myself, dam they don't look that fast I could stay with them. Not only could I not hang, I got lapped! I personally think do a few Beginner races and if you podium with relative ease than move up. When riding in the woods with your buddies, when you get tired ya just stop for a minute and catch your breath. Try riding at a fast pace for 2 hrs without stopping. There is no shame racing the Cat 3's The top guys are no slugs. If ya don't wanna run with the big dogs ... stay on the porch.

Your friendly neighborhood Racerchick ... :)
 

euphoria

Member
last yr i raced beginner for my first ever xc race at kitatinny (h2h). i wasnt trying too hard, jsut kinda feeling it out. i got 3rd. later in the year i raced sport at bear creek (m.a.s.s) and really tried hard. i midpacked it. no excuses but bc is a much harder course and i flatted, went over the bars and lost my back brakes. super fun but very humbling lol. but at least i know where i stand and i am training hard this winter so i can hopefully at least finish in the top 20. :rofl: looking back, i am glad i did beginner my first race to experience a podium at least once
 

pixychick

JORBA: Ringwood
JORBA.ORG
All good advice in this thread. Pre-register. Try to pre-ride ahead so there are no surprises. Learn multiple lines, because plenty of racers go too hard off the start and falter blocking the good lines. Get to the race early to warm up or check the course if you did not get there earlier. Go hard, but remember to pace yourself. It may take a few races to figure that out. Stay open minded. Most importantly, meet great people and have fun!!

It may go something like this ...:getsome::D:cry::scared::drooling::hitsfan: :sleep:
 
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