HFCS article

Kirt

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What's Up With the High Fructose Corn Syrup Commercials?
By Alicia Kendig, RD, CSSD

Looks like the Corn Refiners Association took a cue from Big Oil and launched a series of commercials in defense of their biggest cash cow. Over the past few days, I’ve been inundated with calls and emails asking simply, “What’s up with the high fructose corn syrup commercials? Are they really true?” Well, they’re not lying, but they’re not telling the whole truth either.

The commercials, funded by the Corn Refiners Association, make the claims that high fructose corn syrup is, “Made from corn, doesn’t have artificial ingredients, has the same calories as sugar and just like sugar, it’s fine in moderation.” Based on these statements, yes, the commercials are accurate. HFCS is a sweetener made from corn and has a nearly identical chemical composition as granulated sugar. According to the Corn Refiners Association, adding HFCS to products “adds sweetness equivalent to normal sugar, enhances fruit and spice flavors, gives chewy breakfast bars their soft texture and helps to preserve freshness.” If you’re into pre-packaged, highly-processed foods, I guess those steps could be necessary to make the items palatable.

The key statement here is, “in moderation.” Innumerable beverages, condiments, crackers, cookies, breads, soups, ice creams, and breakfast cereals have hidden sugars in the form of high fructose corn syrup. Consuming HFCS in moderation is difficult because it’s so pervasive in packaged foods, and the Corn Refiners Association provides no definition of “moderation”. The only way to monitor your intake or avoid it is to read food labels vigilantly and/or consume fewer packaged foods.

The part of the Corn Refiners Association’s information I have trouble with is their assertion that HFCS is identical to table sugar. Neither of these sweeteners is a completely natural form of sugar. Both are isolated forms of naturally-found sugars that have been processed and have been stripped of key nutrients. They are both absorbed into the body faster than raw sugar and tend to be less satisfying or filling. No, consumption of HFCS does not lead directly to the development of diabetes and obesity. But foods containing HFCS tend to have more calories, lower nutritional value, and lower amounts of fiber than foods made with granulated sugar, natural sugars, or no added sugar at all. The prevalence of HFCS and other processed sugars in packaged foods leads people – at least partly - to consume more calories than they realize. This is because HFCS adds calories without triggering normal satiety – or fullness – cues. Couple this with the decrease in the population’s overall energy expenditure, and voila…rampant weight gain.

Interestingly, economic downturns have a negative impact on the nutritional quality of many people’s food choices. Earlier in human history, impoverished populations relied more on produce and grains because they were inexpensive, and meat and packaged foods were beyond their means. These days, processed foods are cheaper than fresh foods – partly because HFCS is so inexpensive compared to natural sugars. For families struggling in the current economy, it’s an unfortunate fact that you can buy more calories for your buck by hitting up the “Dollar Menu” at a fast-food joint and stocking up on cheap frozen and canned meals.
Despite the thoughtful assurances of the Corn Refiners Association, my recommendations around HFCS still stand: minimize your consumption of high-fructose corn syrup, as it increases the caloric density of foods without adding to their nutritional value, and because minimizing HFCS means you’ll also be minimizing your consumption of processed foods. Consume natural forms of sugar, packaged in nutrient-dense foods that not only give you a sensible serving of calories, but also fill you up and gives you a dose of health-boosting vitamins and minerals.

http://www.trainright.com/articles.asp?uid=3935&p=3933
 

Mike679

Active Member
I recently saw a show on PBS about the omnipresence of corn in our society that was pretty interesting and somewhat disturbing. Much of what we eat has some form of corn content directly or indirectly. Chicken, beef, pork - all fed corn in some form or another. All dairy from animals fed corn. Evidently corn bulks up the animals moreso than those that are grass-fed. In fact, they stated that the meat from grass-fed animals was less flavorful. Couple that with high-fructose corn syrup that is contained in pretty much any snack food that comes in a sealed package and American's overall corn consumption is quite high in the average diet.

Since watching that documentary I've actually become more cognizant of my HFCS intake and try to stay w/ more whole-grain and fruit and vegetable type of stuff for snacking purposes and stay away from vending-machine foods.
 

RNG1

Well-Known Member
Jeez yet another problem that we'll have to deal with in this country that will come from this economic fallout that I wouldn't have thought of....
 

hardtale70

She's Gone From Suck to Blow
Shop Keep
Aside from the no alcohol,nicotine or caffine thing, HFCS is the only thing i try to religously avoid. It will blow your mind the difference it makes after just a couple weeks
 

hardtale70

She's Gone From Suck to Blow
Shop Keep
It is in almost everthing but you start by avoiding the drinks it's in.It's always like the first or second ingredient in most bevs. Drink water and watch the industrial baked goods for starters(BTW, I'm bummed you left before i got a chance to chat at the picnic Walt. I'm sorry....
 

walter

Fourth Party
It's alright bro. I knew my wife had something to do, she just neglected to tell me it started at 5pm. Good thing she called me at 345 to see when I was coming home.:rolleyes:

HFCS, I think that stuff is in soda:hmmm:
 

Kmoodymz3

New Member
Aside from the no alcohol,nicotine or caffine thing, HFCS is the only thing i try to religously avoid. It will blow your mind the difference it makes after just a couple weeks


Well I can't give up alcohol or caffeine but I do moderate them, however I gave up HFCS a few months ago. It made a huge difference in how I feel. I have more energy, less joint pain, sleep better... weird for sure and I have no idea why but once I started feeling so good it was easy to stay away from the stuff.

Ok so what do I eat? Nothing processed, I love to cook so this isn't a huge problem for me, and lots of fresh fruit and vegetables, eggs, oatmeal, nuts, beans, chicken, occasionally some red meat, fish, rice and other grains like cous, cous, etc.

Drinks, water, water, water and instead of soda, I drink seltzer with a small amount of fruit juice (no sugar added) or lemon and lime in it.

Ok so you all don't think I'm a total health freak, I try to eat this way most of the time. Besides I still love my wine and beer thankfully they do not contain and HFCS :D
 

ellbiddy

Active Member
A lot of that is in your head I reckon. I agree that damn near anything edible is okay in moderation. The problem that was originally presented where "poorer" families are relying on prepackaged foods and stuff high in HFCS stinks a little. No matter how "poor" people buy soda, soda is as expensive if not more expensive that just drinking plain old bottled war...hell even tap water. The thing is that most people either
1.) Don't give a shit
or
2.) Don't know any better.

Usually a combination of 1+2 are in effect.

Eating "healthy" doesn't require you to drink your lowfat double soy lates it takes some effort to filter the garbage on the market. When we first moved to this country we survived off one shitty janitorial salary...none of us became obese and (God willing) have not developed any sort of problems from food related issues or otherwise. We all made it to college and out and my mom finally learned english and began teaching and working in industry (she was a research chemist with a PhD and had to start with cleaning floors because she didn't speak the language). So in my eyes it's not a boohoo I'm poor and turn to food that's bad for me issue. It's a social issue of...little johny wants a big mac and mommy doesn't know how to say no. Eating "dollar menu" items is NOT cheaper than buying $2 worth of chicken (a whole chicken on sale or a couple breats, legs, or thighs) and grilling it from shoprite. the way she writes that getting more "calories for your buck" is flat out silly....who buys based on that merit? This one has 100 more calories, lets get it, better value. If you buy the "right" foods it's not that expensive, it may cost marginally more, but like I've always said an investment in yourself and your health is of the best kind. People need to be educated on the pro's and con's of certain things and use their brains to put 2 and 2 together.

What really needs to happen is for people to learn some individual responsibility, this isn't aimed at anyone btw, just in general. It should be instinctively good to avoid crap that's been processed to hell for an adult, but a kid doesn't know any better. Teach them that and they'll make it a-okay.
 

The Kalmyk

Well-Known Member
I am guilty of selling alot of HFCS...On a personal note as of recently I have been good with my intake...I do in stay away from packaged goods, beer in moderation, cut out meat from my diet and any other funny activities I may have participated in after a long day at work ...My endurance has improved ten fold for these changes...In talking too a member named Badline I asked him "What do you eat to keep yourself in optimal riding condition?"...The first thing he said was "I try to avoid HFCS"....I don't want to be anal about what I eat but it has paid me back for doing so...I will take a closer look for those HFCS...Thanks for this post Kirt
 

The Kalmyk

Well-Known Member
Ok so what do I eat? Nothing processed, I love to cook so this isn't a huge problem for me, and lots of fresh fruit and vegetables, eggs, oatmeal, nuts, beans, chicken, occasionally some red meat, fish, rice and other grains like cous, cous, etc.


I may suggest that if your going to eat chicken, eat free range only...I have a buddy who is a food scientist who clearly is against eating chicken...The stories he tells me has completely changed my view of the chicken business...Red meat may contain mor fat BUT MUCH CLEANER...I have a farm near my house that offers fresh free range chicken that I'm on a list for...Can't wait:drooling:
 

walter

Fourth Party
I have this friend who works for a LARGE carbonated beverage company. This friend was recently asked about what happens to damaged/out of date/returned product. This friend then went on to say that the said product is put into a giant compactor/separator where the package is separated from the liquid.

The package then goes to a recycler, and the liquid is purchased by a large pig farmer.

What does it all mean? I dont know, this friend will let you make your own conclusions:D:rolleyes:
 
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