Heart rate monitor

C

Cthulhu

Guest
I'm hoping to collect everyone's thoughts about heart rate monitors.

Which one do you use if you do use one?

Pricepoint...

GPS/no GPS...

Any comments/opinions...

I tried checking out mtbr but reviews vary a great deal and there are only a handful that were reviewed by more than one person.
 

walter

Fourth Party
If you want to go the GPS route, many of us are using the Garmin 205 or the 305. The 305 comes with a HRM so you can kill two birds with one stone. The two models are essentially the same, the 305 having a few more features.

I dont use a HRM but many folks here use them as a training tool.
 

mike_243

JORBA Board Member/Chapter Leader
JORBA.ORG
I use the 305 I did not use any model before this but the more I play around with it the more I like it.
it does come with a HM and I do use that to right now the battery on the HM died but I will get a new one its nice to see if I am going to stroke out in the 100 degree heat after the bigger hills. :)
 

Shaggz

A strong 7
do a search on "heart rate" and you will find some good threads on this topic.

a lot of folks will say HR data is not a critical metric for MTB'ing, but more informative for road riding

the garmin 305 seems to be a favorite if you are looking for GPS data

i have a polar watch unit with a chest strap and a garmin edge 205. i purchased both new on e-bay, i don't remember the total, but it was well below $200. while having multiple devices is cumbersome, i would probably purchase the same type of set up again, as opposed to the 305.
 

MixMastaMM

Team Bulldog Rider
Make sure you get a HRM with a chest strap. If the HRM does not have a chest strap, I wonder how accurate it can be. Also, who would want to do the following to see your heart rate? 1. stop riding 2. take off gloves 3. hold fingers on watch 4. read results. You might as well save some cash and just do the old fashion method!
 
C

Cthulhu

Guest
a lot of folks will say HR data is not a critical metric for MTB'ing, but more informative for road riding

I'm looking to use the HRM to help monitor my VO2 for those rides that I want to actually do some structured traing. My aerobic fitness level isn't exactly what it should be so I'd like to include some specific threshold training and interval rides. Just going by easy/moderate/hard intensity isn't accurate enough and the last thing I want to do is go into the gym to train for MTBing.

But yeah I can see HR not being accurate in rides where you are mostly mashing down as opposed to spinning. There's a great deal more emphasis on the anaerobic energy systems.
 
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Norm

Mayor McCheese
Team MTBNJ Halter's
There are of course my own opinions, but...

HR is particularly useless when training in the higher realms, particularly in the anaerobic/VO2max/neuromuscular zones. I assume you mean to monitor your VO2max zone work, not actually monitor your VO2max, which is done only in a lab.

I think HR is only useful at threshold/tempo/endurance zones. And even then if your eating/drinking habits stink, it will still be useless though it will tell you when you're done and it's time to go home.

To step back from your OP, what exactly are you trying to get out of it?
 
C

Cthulhu

Guest
There are of course my own opinions, but...

HR is particularly useless when training in the higher realms, particularly in the anaerobic/VO2max/neuromuscular zones. I assume you mean to monitor your VO2max zone work, not actually monitor your VO2max, which is done only in a lab.

I think HR is only useful at threshold/tempo/endurance zones. And even then if your eating/drinking habits stink, it will still be useless though it will tell you when you're done and it's time to go home.

As far as HR/VO2 relations.... 70% VO2 ~ 80-82%MHR, 75 - 85% VO2 (wherein lies the lactate threshold) ~ 88%MHR. The higher above lactate threshold, closer to VO2 MAX, anaerobic energy systems are utilize to great effect. So for interval and repetition training monitoring HR ensures that I'm not causing myself too high a stress, and as for endurance/threshold training, it would allow me to stay within my target range. LSD - Long slow distance/endurance is at or around 70% of VO2 max; lactate threshold 75 - 85% Vo2 max. Those are pretty solid guidelines (NSCA) but are second to being tested in an exercise lab for individual ranges. But if your lactate threshold is 80% of VO2 MAX it is good to know that the projected HR is 88% MHR for that given %VO2 MAX.

As for training above the lactate threshold into anaerobic functioning I'm not too concerned. I know it will not translate 100% from mode to mode but I'll let my squat/lunge exercises make up for the lack of REP/ interval training.
 
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C

Cthulhu

Guest
That said, I'm not looking for exact measurements so the guidelines do just fine for me... I'm not looking to get into "race" shape, plus it'd be nice not to get lost in the woods or have to check a trail map.


The Garmin 305 looks good to me.
 

Norm

Mayor McCheese
Team MTBNJ Halter's
Your numbers are all in theory, in the field, HR lags so far behind effort that it's not that effective. But before we even talk more about it, if you're not trying to get in race shape, I wouldn't worry about HR at all.

I'm of the new school of training theory. I don't really buy the LSD philosophy. I think the lowest effort you really need to train at is tempo. A lot of the traditional guidelines are being challenged by more and more research and most of them don't really hold up so well.

But, but, at the end of the day, you have to do what works for you, and what keeps you going.
 
C

Cthulhu

Guest
Your numbers are all in theory, in the field, HR lags so far behind effort that it's not that effective. But before we even talk more about it, if you're not trying to get in race shape, I wouldn't worry about HR at all.

I'm of the new school of training theory. I don't really buy the LSD philosophy. I think the lowest effort you really need to train at is tempo. A lot of the traditional guidelines are being challenged by more and more research and most of them don't really hold up so well.

But, but, at the end of the day, you have to do what works for you, and what keeps you going.

Just out of curiousity norm, what do you base the majority of your training on? Intervals at threshold/race pace? For the most part I agree with your view on LSD training - just a way to break up your training days with more exercise. Aerobic specific training has always been a funny subject to me and I've always questioned those training categories. I believe every training session should be fartlek by design with emphasis on intensity at the threshold and above it (not to extremes).
 

tonyride

Don't piss off the red guy
Cool. I just checked it out and found out that it doesn't include a base map. My main requirement is to track where I've been and be able to guide me back if I get lost. I think I'll just stick with my eTrex Legend.
 
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