Frozen derailleur remedy?

jShort

2018 Fantasy Football Toilet Bowl Lead Technician
Team MTBNJ Halter's
I was out last night in the wet, cold, half frozen trails and my XO rear derailleur froze up on me.

Other then going SS, is there anything i can do to prevent this?
 
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jShort

2018 Fantasy Football Toilet Bowl Lead Technician
Team MTBNJ Halter's
are you sure it wasn't your cables? it wasn't that cold last night.

It may have been a combo of both. The derailleur had a coating of ice on it. (it was cold where I was...) in fact the entire bottom of the bike a thin coating of ice on it. When i was putting the bike in my basement i didnt get my hands dirty because all the mud was frozen....

I suppose the cables could have had some moisture in there and froze up as well...
 

BiknBen

Well-Known Member
This can happen sporadically. To ease the following description, lets just talk about the rear shifter/derailleur.

You get water all over the place and it freezes. You are able to shift to bigger rings by pulling cable with the shifter. Then when you attempt to shift to smaller rings nothing happens.

The force of your hand shifting in one direction breaks the ice and it works. Shifting in the other direction is done by releasing cable and relying on the derailleur spring have to pull the slack and move the cage. The force of the spring may not be enough to break the ice and you just get slack in the cable but the derailleur doesn't move.

Possible solution: Get off the bike. Change gears at the shifter to go to the smallest ring. Now pull the derailleur cage with your hand to break the ice. Once things start working again, keep shifting...even if you don't have to. This will keep things from freezing up again.

After going through cold water, it's a good habit to shift the gears and pump the brakes. If everything just sits there motionless, it is more likely to freeze.
 

MEAN IRISH GUY

Horse-faced space dog
the only solution
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jShort

2018 Fantasy Football Toilet Bowl Lead Technician
Team MTBNJ Halter's
This can happen sporadically. To ease the following description, lets just talk about the rear shifter/derailleur.

You get water all over the place and it freezes. You are able to shift to bigger rings by pulling cable with the shifter. Then when you attempt to shift to smaller rings nothing happens.

The force of your hand shifting in one direction breaks the ice and it works. Shifting in the other direction is done by releasing cable and relying on the derailleur spring have to pull the slack and move the cage. The force of the spring may not be enough to break the ice and you just get slack in the cable but the derailleur doesn't move.

Possible solution: Get off the bike. Change gears at the shifter to go to the smallest ring. Now pull the derailleur cage with your hand to break the ice. Once things start working again, keep shifting...even if you don't have to. This will keep things from freezing up again.

After going through cold water, it's a good habit to shift the gears and pump the brakes. If everything just sits there motionless, it is more likely to freeze.

That's exactly the info i was looking for.
Thanks
 

pinkshirtphotos

Active Member
** warning not for environmental friendly people **


carry some karosine, gasoline, or antifreeze in a spray bottle. When you notice things getting frozen spray on frozen parts. May not be good for using all the time but will help in a pita situation.
 

BiknBen

Well-Known Member
...antifreeze in a spray bottle. When you notice things getting frozen spray on frozen parts. May not be good for using all the time but will help in a pita situation.

Actually, the small cans of anti-freeze that you use for your car keyhole may be a great idea.

I'm not sure how I would carry Kerosene or gasoline on the trail.
 
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