Fixie build

MTBTyler

Well-Known Member
I have this old 10 speed.. What do I need to do to make it a fixie? I know I need a fixed hub, but crank set? Could I just use the crank set I have now, or will it be to big (too many teeth)?:confused: Damn you adam for talking me into this!:rofl:
 

warcricket

Like a Jerk
it'd probably be cheaper to just get a new rear wheel with a flip flop hub. you can use the cranks you have on it now. i found an old pair and just sawed off the large chain ring. count the amount of teeth it has and match it with a rear cog that will give you a nice gear ratio. use this to figure it out. in "gear units" select gear inches and type in ur numbers. i ride with 75 gear inches on both my bikes, but i've heard others claim that 70 is the sweet spot.
 

ellbiddy

Active Member
Make sure you don't forget to get a pair of tight jeans, zebra pattern sneakers, a tight t-shirt, and a cycling cap....

Oh, the rear wheel has to be orange while the front should be some form of a carbon aero wheel, you know, to fit in.
 

warcricket

Like a Jerk
Make sure you don't forget to get a pair of tight jeans, zebra pattern sneakers, a tight t-shirt, and a cycling cap....

Oh, the rear wheel has to be orange while the front should be some form of a carbon aero wheel, you know, to fit in.

messenger bag and no brakes, you don't want to be picked on. cause sticks and car crashes may break your bones, but words will hurt forever.
 

al415

Banned
Wait. Is all that hipster shit still being associated with fixed gear bicycles? I remember seeing the sprayed on jeans and ironic KAS-hat-look five years ago in Brooklyn. Surely those guys have moved on to something else by now? Or are we talking about a more suburban hipster here? I have not seen many of those but I've heard rumours they exist.

On a more helpful note, use Crickets gear table and provided the front is not gigantic you'll be fine with the cranks you have. Everthing else can be pretty much the same. I'd suggest a thicker and tougher set of tires than on your road bike; at first it's not as easy to avoid pot-holes etc. on a fixed gear bicycle.
 

MTBTyler

Well-Known Member
If I get a fixed hub or a flip flop hub, do I NEED a truing stand? I have never taken a rim appart before.
 
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soundz

The Hat
Team MTBNJ Halter's
If I get a fixed hub or a flip flop hub, do I NEED a truing stand? I have never taken a rim appart before.

if it's an old (cheap) wheel, you're probably better off getting the whole wheel instead of just the hub .. esp if have no experience buiding/tru'ing wheels

but if you really want to get just the hub, there's ways to tru w/o a stand .. you can do it with your wheel mounted to your bike using some kind of guide like your brakes or make a make-shift stand using a fork mounted to a workbench
 

MTBTyler

Well-Known Member
but if you really want to get just the hub, there's ways to tru w/o a stand .. you can do it with your wheel mounted to your bike using some kind of guide like your brakes or make a make-shift stand using a fork mounted to a workbench
You just gave me a great idea! ill make my own.
 

grilledcheeseking

Well-Known Member
it would be easier to ss that thing than to change out the hub to fix it. redishing a wheel is easier than (re)building a wheel.

that said, there's only a couple ways to learn how to build wheels. if you're gonna teach yourself, bring all your patience, and the ability to walk away when you feel like trashing the stupid *W@@W^& wheel!

oh yea, ty, this is george.
 

soundz

The Hat
Team MTBNJ Halter's
naa a 26, why do you ask?

I think most old road bikes are 27", then at some point road bike standard changed to 700c which is a bit smaller than 27". Here are the rim diameters (bead seat) for different tire sizes:

27" > 630mm (older road bikes)
700c > 622mm (newer road bikes)
26" > 559mm (most mountain bikes)

That's an over simplification. Detailed charts and explanation here: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html If you look at your tire, it should give the exact size which you can match up with the sizes in the chart.

All of this may have some bearing on what hub you can use or not use and the length and number of spokes, axle length, etc... But I'm not sure, I've never built wheels before, so maybe someone else can chime in.
 

soundz

The Hat
Team MTBNJ Halter's
if you're gonna teach yourself, bring all your patience, and the ability to walk away when you feel like trashing the stupid *W@@W^& wheel!

I've heard the same thing from talking to people and reading .. I plan to take apart an old wheel and try to put it together and learn that way before trying anything too crazy.
 
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