Do I need volume spacers?

nj6964

Member
I’ve been enjoying my new Jeffsy over the last month. I set the sag around 25% on my fork and maybe 30% on the shock. However when I ride trails that aren’t even that gnarly, the o-ring ends up showing I nearly bottomed out.

I increased the pressures last night and this morning after bunny hopping over a 2x10 the fork was at 89% travel and the shock at 72%. It seems like, especially the fork is going deep into its travel.

Never used a volume spacer before but is that the simple solution here, just throw one in and see what happens? I believe there’s already one in the fork from factory.

Thanks!!!
 
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How heavy are you?

Im ~185lbs, so I typically use them in my suspension components that use spacers/tokens.....(I have several forks that dont use spacers) My 10 year old who is 90lbs, I have all of them out, and its still probably not right for him.

I would say, in general...Tokens/spacers are usually very cheap, and pretty easy to take in and out...so its not hard to play around and experiment with them.
 
I’ve been enjoying my new Jeffry over the last month. I set the sag around 25% on my fork and maybe 30% on the shock. However when I ride trails that aren’t even that gnarly, the o-ring ends up showing I nearly bottomed out.

I increased the pressures last night and this morning after bunny hopping over a 2x10 the fork was at 89% travel and the shock at 72%. It seems like, especially the fork is going deep into its travel.

Never used a volume spacer before but is that the simple solution here, just throw one in and see what happens? I believe there’s already one in the fork from factory.

Thanks!!!
What fork is it? The Fox 34 Performance 130mm on my Pivot T429 had 3 volume spacers included, I've removed 2.
 
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Does the shock have adjustable compression? If so, you may want to try running a little more and see how it feels.

How does the bike feel, does it feel overly soft in the rear throughout the travel?
 
Thanks for the great responses! The fork is a Lyrik base with 150mm travel. I believe it has 1 spacer in it currently. I’m running in the middle compression setting.

I weigh 180 lbs with gear so this tracks with UtahJoe’s experience. The bike feels great, but I’m comparing it to a 10 year old XC bike. Sounds like it’s time to experiment. Going on a ride tonight maybe I’ll try it out.
 
Imho fork sag is useless, just go by feel . I can easily hop around in the parking lot and use 80% of my travel, then go send the biggest features at the bike park and not bottom out . The last 20 to 10 mm of travel is hard to use so unless your bottoming out frequently it sounds like your in the ballpark.
 
Sag is really tricky on some forks/shocks. I have both where I can add another 10 PSI and sag doesn't move. Start with a bit more air pressure first.

Spacers make the spring more progressive. Google the physics. You have a whole contingent of people who want more linear travel spending a bunch on new coil shocks, but then with air shocks insist they need more spacers..
 
I remember watching a suspension setup video from Jordi at Fox where he said that you should be able to use 80% travel by doing a few really hard bounces in the parking lot.

If you've got sag where you want it but you're still bottoming out (i.e. you actually feel it bottom out) multiple times per ride then you might want to try adding spacers to take up that volume. Otherwise I wouldn't worry too much. Travel is there for you to use it.
 
Just opened it up and no spacers…added one, we shall see.
I think you are on the right track. Having added tokens to my Bluto, Lyrik, and now my ZEB they make all the difference. You can ramp up without getting a harsh ride from too much added compression or air pressure. Bike type will make a huge difference so everyone will have a little different feel, so experiment away. That reminds me, I need to soften the ZEB.
 
Spacers allow you to run lower pressure for better small bump compliance. Check you rebound settings to as its possible you are packing up over continuous hits. IMO if you arent using tokens you arent getting the most out of your suspension. I have the MRP ramp control so i have more adjustment and can do it externally. My only complaint is you might blow through the mid stroke.
 
Spacers allow you to run lower pressure for better small bump compliance. Check you rebound settings to as its possible you are packing up over continuous hits. IMO if you arent using tokens you arent getting the most out of your suspension. I have the MRP ramp control so i have more adjustment and can do it externally. My only complaint is you might blow through the mid stroke.
Try the DSD runt and you may honestly rethink that stance. I had 3 spacers in my Fox 36 and it felt like crap. Removed them and had it serviced which made it significantly better. The Runt brought it to another level for support with better small bump compliance. I wasn’t able to achieve that with spacers…
 
Ride last night w 1 spacer and similar pressure as before and it felt too rough. No small bump compliance. Dropped the pressures, need to test again.
 
Ride last night w 1 spacer and similar pressure as before and it felt too rough. No small bump compliance. Dropped the pressures, need to test again.
Add a second spacer and run 30% sag. You're welcome. 😁
 
I don’t know if this applies to you OP because I have a different brand fork (Fox). But have you tried upping the pressure?

The only reason I ask is because I went down the rabbit hole of low pressures. Yes the small bump comfort increased but the cost of stability and general composure especially at speed.

My opinion is worth nothing because this is the internet. “…but…” all kidding aside I find my 36 to be much better with a firm spring setting. Without getting involved in a sag conversation I will say Fox’s 18 to 20% sag is spot on as far as performance is concerned, even with my DSD Runt (I have seen many mention on other forums that you can run higher sag…I respectfully disagree).
 
I don’t know if this applies to you OP because I have a different brand fork (Fox). But have you tried upping the pressure?

The only reason I ask is because I went down the rabbit hole of low pressures. Yes the small bump comfort increased but the cost of stability and general composure especially at speed.

My opinion is worth nothing because this is the internet. “…but…” all kidding aside I find my 36 to be much better with a firm spring setting. Without getting involved in a sag conversation I will say Fox’s 18 to 20% sag is spot on as far as performance is concerned, even with my DSD Runt (I have seen many mention on other forums that you can run higher sag…I respectfully disagree).
Fox dampers typically get harsh if you run lower pressures and ride more in their mid range.

People find often a little more pressure on a Fox actually removes some harshness.

Adding a Runt for me helped though. Could run a little less pressure but not lose the harshness.
 
I don’t know if this applies to you OP because I have a different brand fork (Fox). But have you tried upping the pressure?

The only reason I ask is because I went down the rabbit hole of low pressures. Yes the small bump comfort increased but the cost of stability and general composure especially at speed.

My opinion is worth nothing because this is the internet. “…but…” all kidding aside I find my 36 to be much better with a firm spring setting. Without getting involved in a sag conversation I will say Fox’s 18 to 20% sag is spot on as far as performance is concerned, even with my DSD Runt (I have seen many mention on other forums that you can run higher sag…I respectfully disagree).
I went down the rabbit hole with the Fox 34 Performance on my Pivot T429. This post discussed some things that might be relevant to this thread.
 
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