Clipless pedals?

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integra evan

Guest
What are clipless pedals supposed to do, and what do they consist of? Are 'cleats' supposed to attach to your shoes?
 

J-Dro

Well-Known Member
I never understood the term "clipless pedals". If they are clipless, then why do I "clip in"?

OK now that I've got that Jerry Seinfeld inspired comment out of the way, yes clipless pedals consist of a pedal with some sort of engagement mechanism and a separate cleat that attaches to the shoe. The cleats come with the pedals, not with the shoes. Different brands of pedals have their own unique cleats, so you can't mix and match.

Check out this thread if you want to hear some of us debate the pros/cons of the various clipless brands.
 

anrothar

entirely thrilled
they help you embarrassingly fall over in front of all your buddies or better yet, complete strangers, when you come to a stop. ;)

they actually drastically improve your efficiency and help keep your feet on the pedals on bumpy terrain. takes a few rides to get used to them though.
 

ArmyOfNone

Well-Known Member
they help you embarrassingly fall over in front of all your buddies or better yet, complete strangers, when you come to a stop. ;)

they actually drastically improve your efficiency and help keep your feet on the pedals on bumpy terrain. takes a few rides to get used to them though.
:eek: Like the first ride ever with clipless pedals and i fell off the bridge at six mile and there was a cute blonde watching me climb out of the stream? That wasnt embarrassing at all. Nope. :eek:
 

SpartaBard

Well-Known Member
Team MTBNJ Halter's
I have even had embarrassing falls while standing still. It is always sort of in slow motion too. :eek:


Go with the eggbeaters.
 

pixychick

JORBA: Ringwood
JORBA.ORG
What are clipless pedals supposed to do, and what do they consist of? Are 'cleats' supposed to attach to your shoes?
Anrother said it .. efficiency and consistant pedaling.

I think the term clipless came from the original method which was "toe clips". Before clipless pedals, there were these little baskets that you slipped your feet into. I started with them, way back. Real pain to get in and out of on the trail. :mad2:

Someone had the great idea to invent what we have now. I think they are called clipless because they eliminated the need for toe clips.
 
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DANSPANK

Guest
I've done the slow-motion fall over at a traffic light infront of many cars. I come to a stop and gradually tilt over, frantically trying to pull your foot out but never quite making it.

At least it gives drivers a good laugh.

Another good one is when you stall on a trail and then fall down a slope. You fall, the bike lands on top of you and traps a foot between it and the ground It takes a few minutes to unclip your foot from the peddle and you feel a tool.

Just remember not to stick your arm out to break your fall - you'll break it alright, your wrist or collar bone. It's a bit like being on fire - stop, drop and roll...
 
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integra evan

Guest
I think I'll just stick with my platform pedals, I do a lot of trail/pit riding and like to be able to move my feet around, thanks for all the info!
 

bruce.b

Dickwad
>>they actually drastically improve your efficiency and help keep your feet on the pedals on bumpy terrain. takes a few rides to get used to them though.<<

I must be Lance Armstrong then. I've been riding for years with BMX flats and have never had a problem keeping up with all the clipless riders. The efficiency thing is drastically overstated.

It takes more skill to ride offroad on platforms. Clipless does help keep your feet on the pedals in bumpy terrain, but that's a skill you learn to do if you ride without foot retention.

For me, platforms have several big advantages. The most obvious is that you can put your foot down instantly, much faster than you can with clipless. Maybe a bigger advantage (and the main reason I use em) is that you can slightly move your foot around on platforms. IMO, this significantly reduces the possibility of repetitive stress injuries. It's always bad to lock yourself into a single groove like clipless does.

Try both and just use what you like. Ignore the *experts*.

bruce boysen
 

Norm

Mayor McCheese
Team MTBNJ Halter's
Ah, yet another religious biking subject.

I suggest standing on the seat like a circus clown.
 
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triameleon

Guest
representing the Flat pedal society....

I wonder how many Flat pedal riders are here? With all those stories of falling over without unclipping I doubt any newbies reading this post are going to run out and purchase a pair.:)
 
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Timekiller

Guest
I like my flats... I have a pair of Mallets, and just cant get adjusted to them. Ill probably keep with the flats, then again I dont have any slippage problems at all with my Mosh Step pedals.
 

SpartaBard

Well-Known Member
Team MTBNJ Halter's
I wonder how many Flat pedal riders are here? With all those stories of falling over without unclipping I doubt any newbies reading this post are going to run out and purchase a pair.:)
I actually have not done it in a while... You get the hang of unclipping after a while.
 

hardtale70

She's Gone From Suck to Blow
Shop Keep
what they do is cost money,what they consist of is complete BS.
it's great to know there are other flatties on the site.I'll never understand why people tell me how much faster i'd be if i clipped in while i'm passing them....................................take off yer tap shoes cause we ain't dancin'!!
 
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DANSPANK

Guest
I'm prepping my Mountain Cycle Fury for Diablo but and certainly using flats there - I can't fathom attacking that shit and being locked-in. I'm imagining broken bones in my future even with flats...
 

Allamuchy Joe

Not White House Approved
JORBA.ORG
I think I'll just stick with my platform pedals, I do a lot of trail/pit riding and like to be able to move my feet around, thanks for all the info!
Don't let the stories scare you. I know the Shimano SPD system allows you to adjust the clip tension and you can "break loose" with little force if you have to.

A good alternative are the platform/clip pedals and it gives you the benefit of both worlds. Here is a picture of that type of pedal:


I have a pair of them on my Singlespeed because they give you a little more platform if you have difficulty clipping in while starting on a hill. Also, you can ride with regular shoes in a pinch with them.

Once you get used to clipless, it is hard going back.
 
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Norm

Mayor McCheese
Team MTBNJ Halter's
Don't let the stories scare you. I know the Shimano SPD system allows you to adjust the clip tension and you can "break loose" with little force if you have to.

A good alternative are the platform/clip pedals and it gives you the benefit of both worlds. I have a pair of them on my Singlespeed because they give you a little more platform if you have difficulty clipping in while starting on a hill.

Once you get used to clipless, it is hard going back.
Good post. I try to run my SPDs at the perfect "break point". If you make them completely loose you will unclip by virtue of pulling out hard, as in "oh shit I'm falling over" hard. This is what I want. On the other hand, if it's too loose you pop out too easily when you clip a rock, etc. So I try to find the right spot where I can get the "oh shit" pullout but without clipping out randomly.

I put platforms on the SS when I built it up this winter and hated it. So I agree that it's very hard to go back.
 

Shaggz

A strong 7
i'm just curious what type of riding background the flat-zealots come from. my guess - bmx/trial/dh with a lot of years riding under their belt?
 

SpartaBard

Well-Known Member
Team MTBNJ Halter's
I am currently using the Candy Cs on my SS vs. the eggbeaters to get a little more platform.
 
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