Chain Slip

Deezul

New Member
I have an almost new bike, its less than a year old and I'm having the chain slipping off the rear cog whenever I put a good amount of pressure on it, like during climbing. I don't think it could be chain wear or cassette wear since the bike is so new. I also tried to rule out that I'm cross chaining by only using 1-3 and 2-5 gears.

It shifts perfectly as well, since I thought that not enough/too much cable tension may have been the problem.
 

alex_k

Well-Known Member
it could be ... I killed a cassette on my first mtb bike in 2 or 3 months. It was a cheap SRAM.
 

sj_john

Member
Slack Cable

It sounds like you may need your cable adjusted.
It stretches over time and causes slipping.
 

J-Dro

Well-Known Member
It could also be a simple derailleur alignment issue. Cables stretch over time and you may just need to tweak the cable tension to line up the derailleur with the cassette cogs.

Always start with the simplest solution and work up from there.

A year old cassette may or may not be worn, depending how many miles are on it. If you do change the cassette, make sure you install a new chain at the same time.
 

warcricket

Like a Jerk
could be a number of things...

-stiff link
-bent hanger
-poorly adjusted derailleur
-worn cassette- don't rule this out on a cheap bike
 

Deezul

New Member
thanks for the fast responses. How would I go about finding a stiff link? running through the cable and just testing each link to see how it moves?
 

betta285

New Member
I have an almost new bike, its less than a year old and I'm having the chain slipping off the rear cog whenever I put a good amount of pressure on it, like during climbing. I don't think it could be chain wear or cassette wear since the bike is so new. I also tried to rule out that I'm cross chaining by only using 1-3 and 2-5 gears.

It shifts perfectly as well, since I thought that not enough/too much cable tension may have been the problem.

My vote is towards a stretched chain/worn cassette. Before I really learned how to use the gears and keep a higher cadence and less torque on the pedals, I went through two cassettes/chains (one set on two different bikes) in a matter of a month or two. A lot of out of the saddle hammering on a moderately high gear will surely stretch the chain quickly. If so, any LBS would be able to diagnose/repair it for relatively cheap. I see you're in NB so you have plenty of reputable LBSs to choose from.

To check for a stiff link, or how I do at least, get at eye level with the drivetrain and backpedal the cranks slowly. Keep an eye out for signs of the chain "bunching up" and focus on the links as they come off and go onto the chain ring/cassette.

Jim
 

warcricket

Like a Jerk
thanks for the fast responses. How would I go about finding a stiff link? running through the cable and just testing each link to see how it moves?

you can do that or watch the bottom pulley of ur rear derailleur while back pedaling. if there is a noticeable skip, locate the link that it occurs on and loosen it by spreading it a bit with a screw driver.
 

BiknBen

Well-Known Member
This reeks of worn cassette. If it was cable stretch the bike would not shift right. Wrenching advice on the interweb sucks. Take it to a shop.
 

Brian Snyder

JORBA "Roaming Gnome"
JORBA.ORG
I second the shop visit, if you can't easily fix it yourself. You are a stones throw from Halters, Yes? They will treat you right.
 

Deezul

New Member
Well I just found out I got off school tomorrow so I'll probably be headed over to Halters if they're open.
 

Norm

Mayor McCheese
Team MTBNJ Halter's
The cassette is worn. It's a year old. People replace XT and XTR stuff after a year. Cheap or not that thing is gonzo at this stage.
 
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