Ask Norm Next Tuesday

Juggernaut

Master of the Metaphor
@Norm #ANNT Official Question

What is the fake meat endgame?

People have been pushing meat substitutes for as long as I can remember. Some do so because of the whole cruelty to animals thing. Ok, I don’t subscribe to that but I can totally understand it.

Others push it for the claimed health benefits. Ok I guess I can see that too. Despite the

But here’s the thing, if you’re opposed to the whole meat thing, why would you try to make it look and (laughably, taste like) meat?

Calorie wise, many meat substitutes actually have more calories (ton of oil) than the real thing (fast food excluded of course).

So we now come to the so called “impossible burgers”. They came up with a formulation that gives the “soylent green” the taste of charred flesh, they even have hemoglobin in the name. Why? It “should” make the veggie folks sick to taste something that “tastes” like cooked flesh. And anything “that” modified has got to be a health “time bomb”.

So why? What is the real endgame?
 
@Norm #ANNT Official Question

What is the fake meat endgame?

People have been pushing meat substitutes for as long as I can remember. Some do so because of the whole cruelty to animals thing. Ok, I don’t subscribe to that but I can totally understand it.

Others push it for the claimed health benefits. Ok I guess I can see that too. Despite the

But here’s the thing, if you’re opposed to the whole meat thing, why would you try to make it look and (laughably, taste like) meat?

Calorie wise, many meat substitutes actually have more calories (ton of oil) than the real thing (fast food excluded of course).

So we now come to the so called “impossible burgers”. They came up with a formulation that gives the “soylent green” the taste of charred flesh, they even have hemoglobin in the name. Why? It “should” make the veggie folks sick to taste something that “tastes” like cooked flesh. And anything “that” modified has got to be a health “time bomb”.

So why? What is the real endgame?
Meat tastes awesome, so people who want to not eat animals want something awesome. The look thing is what gets me tho.
 

Paul H

Fearless OOS Poser
@Norm #ANNT Official Question

What is the fake meat endgame?

People have been pushing meat substitutes for as long as I can remember. Some do so because of the whole cruelty to animals thing. Ok, I don’t subscribe to that but I can totally understand it.

Others push it for the claimed health benefits. Ok I guess I can see that too. Despite the

But here’s the thing, if you’re opposed to the whole meat thing, why would you try to make it look and (laughably, taste like) meat?

Calorie wise, many meat substitutes actually have more calories (ton of oil) than the real thing (fast food excluded of course).

So we now come to the so called “impossible burgers”. They came up with a formulation that gives the “soylent green” the taste of charred flesh, they even have hemoglobin in the name. Why? It “should” make the veggie folks sick to taste something that “tastes” like cooked flesh. And anything “that” modified has got to be a health “time bomb”.

So why? What is the real endgame?
But it's not Tuesday...
 

JimN

Captain Wildcat
Team MTBNJ Halter's
But would it taste awesome to them? Honest question?
My wife has been a pescetarian (vegetarian but eats eggs, dairy, fish/shellfish) since 2008, because she read a book about the way the animals we eat are treated and slaughtered. She hasn't had pork in 11 years, but when she walks into a room and smells bacon, she's like "ohhhhh bacon." She won't eat it, but she still likes the smell. If there was a plant based "bacon" that tasted just like the real thing, then I guarantee you she would eat it. That's obviously just a sample size of one though.

I also suspect that the point of making plant based burgers that taste like the real thing is aimed more at people that are not vegetarians. I've had just about every fake burger on the market. Beyond and Impossible have gotten pretty damn close to the real thing. I strongly suggest that everyone should at least try them and see what you think.
 
My wife has been a pescetarian (vegetarian but eats eggs, dairy, fish/shellfish) since 2008, because she read a book about the way the animals we eat are treated and slaughtered. She hasn't had pork in 11 years, but when she walks into a room and smells bacon, she's like "ohhhhh bacon." She won't eat it, but she still likes the smell. If there was a plant based "bacon" that tasted just like the real thing, then I guarantee you she would eat it. That's obviously just a sample size of one though.

I also suspect that the point of making plant based burgers that taste like the real thing is aimed more at people that are not vegetarians. I've had just about every fake burger on the market. Beyond and Impossible have gotten pretty damn close to the real thing. I strongly suggest that everyone should at least try them and see what you think.
I'm on almost the same exact boat (my wife doesn't eat fish though, and I eat the occasional chicken or meat even though most rarely), but we don't look for the vegetarian version of meats, we just eat 'natural' vegetables as we're skeptical of what the process to produce those 'fake' meats could involve...
 
Again, I have no issues at all with people who feel that way (so long as they aren’t trying to influence me) so no troll here....

But would it taste awesome to them? Honest question?
My oldest daughter is mostly vegetarian (she does eat fish, eggs, dairy) and she has no desire to eat stuff that's marketed to taste like meat. Her opinion is that if you want to have something that tastes like a burger then just eat a burger, no point in pretending that it's something it's not.

Personally, I don't care either way but some of the alternative stuff is pretty tasty. For example, there's some veggie burgers that I really like but I wouldn't call them a true substitute for the real thing.
 
@Norm #ANNT Official Question

What is the fake meat endgame?

People have been pushing meat substitutes for as long as I can remember. Some do so because of the whole cruelty to animals thing. Ok, I don’t subscribe to that but I can totally understand it.

Others push it for the claimed health benefits. Ok I guess I can see that too. Despite the

But here’s the thing, if you’re opposed to the whole meat thing, why would you try to make it look and (laughably, taste like) meat?

Calorie wise, many meat substitutes actually have more calories (ton of oil) than the real thing (fast food excluded of course).

So we now come to the so called “impossible burgers”. They came up with a formulation that gives the “soylent green” the taste of charred flesh, they even have hemoglobin in the name. Why? It “should” make the veggie folks sick to taste something that “tastes” like cooked flesh. And anything “that” modified has got to be a health “time bomb”.

So why? What is the real endgame?
Give me a substitute I'd eat fake meat over real meat, main motivation is the environment. I have slowly unintentionally been eating less meat.
 
My oldest daughter is mostly vegetarian (she does eat fish, eggs, dairy) and she has no desire to eat stuff that's marketed to taste like meat. Her opinion is that if you want to have something that tastes like a burger then just eat a burger, no point in pretending that it's something it's not.

Personally, I don't care either way but some of the alternative stuff is pretty tasty. For example, there's some veggie burgers that I really like but I wouldn't call them a true substitute for the real thing.
I will say impossible burgers are really tasty. I get it at a local spot sometimes just because it's good. I like veggies, but if I ever became vegetarian, I'd want some cool meat-like options to satisfy my meat craving. It's basically the same as artificial sugar (which causes cancer or something).

Also...
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JimN

Captain Wildcat
Team MTBNJ Halter's
You can't know for sure, but googling shows there have been studies:
https://www.fastcompany.com/9024183...w-beyond-meats-environmental-impact-stacks-up

That was commissioned by Beyond Meat, but it supposedly went through a third party review.
That is interesting (and suggesting ideas about investing in stocks) , but I kind of got lost when they stated that it takes 18,000 gallons of water to produce a pound of meat. Not saying it isn't true but I would be interested in checking how they came to that number as opposed to the substantially lower number of gallons (740) needed to grow a pound of peas. Keeping in mind neither a pound of meat nor a pound of peas are a natural occurrence, I believe you get about 440lbs of meat out of a 1000lbs cow and I have no idea of how many pounds of peas are produced by a plant.
 
That is interesting (and suggesting ideas about investing in stocks) , but I kind of got lost when they stated that it takes 18,000 gallons of water to produce a pound of meat. Not saying it isn't true but I would be interested in checking how they came to that number as opposed to the substantially lower number of gallons (740) needed to grow a pound of peas. Keeping in mind neither a pound of meat nor a pound of peas are a natural occurrence, I believe you get about 440lbs of meat out of a 1000lbs cow and I have no idea of how many pounds of peas are produced by a plant.
I'm curious as to what @Norm has to say about it next Tuesday but the way I understand it, the amount of resources needed to produce animal protein is much higher than plant protein. The only reason this is a problem is because there are way too many people on this planet to reasonably sustain with the natural resources we have leading to the current push against meat.

I'm sorry for contributing to the oozing of this thread but it's something that I have an opinion about.
 

Juggernaut

Master of the Metaphor
My oldest daughter is mostly vegetarian (she does eat fish, eggs, dairy) and she has no desire to eat stuff that's marketed to taste like meat. Her opinion is that if you want to have something that tastes like a burger then just eat a burger, no point in pretending that it's something it's not.

Personally, I don't care either way but some of the alternative stuff is pretty tasty. For example, there's some veggie burgers that I really like but I wouldn't call them a true substitute for the real thing.
I get this.... I happen to really like the black bean burger they have at work..... it has it’s own unique taste, nothing like meat and that’s totally cool.
 

Juggernaut

Master of the Metaphor
Give me a substitute I'd eat fake meat over real meat, main motivation is the environment. I have slowly unintentionally been eating less meat.
And that’s also totally cool. In a totally unofficial and not statistically viable informal sampling I’ve done over the past few years environmental impact as the reason is on the rise, but still trail ethical and health related reasons. Though, commercial farming practices are certainly not environmentally friendly. But that’s a different discussion.