a comfy saddle

MEAN IRISH GUY

Horse-faced space dog
im a bigger guy so dinky little saddles are a bit hard for me. can anyone recommend me a good soft saddle thats not a lazyboy? lol
 

larkin42

New Member
I'm a big guy as well as was having the same issue. I ended up the "WTB Speed V Pro Gel Saddle". Last time I was in Halters, J had some still available. Seems to work well for me.
 

mattybfat

The Opinion Police
Team MTBNJ Halter's
IMG I have a WTB speed v comp brand new still in package you can take it for $15
 

rlb

Well-Known Member
I'm a big guy as well as was having the same issue. I ended up the "WTB Speed V Pro Gel Saddle". Last time I was in Halters, J had some still available. Seems to work well for me.

I have the non-gel version of this saddle and I love it. As much as you can love a saddle.
 

stb222

Love Drunk
Jerk Squad
The WTB rocket is good and i currently ride the WTB pure V race, which is a really comfy saddle, almost too comfy andyou can get it with camo sides.
 

clarkenstein

JORBA Money Launderer
JORBA.ORG
i don't have a good one one to recommend, but i have one you shouldn't get - wtb silverado. i have it on my bike now... it eats your cheeks after 1/2 hour.

i just bought a WTB gel version (i don't know if its the silverado or something similar). hopefully its better.
 

mattybfat

The Opinion Police
Team MTBNJ Halter's
i don't have a good one one to recommend, but i have one you shouldn't get - wtb silverado. i have it on my bike now... it eats your cheeks after 1/2 hour.QUOTE]

Funny I liked my silverado so much that I bought one for my 29er....
 

RacerChick

Hudson Valley Girl
Fizik Comfort Performance

im a bigger guy so dinky little saddles are a bit hard for me. can anyone recommend me a good soft saddle thats not a lazyboy? lol

http://www.fizik.it/products_lifesaddles.aspx
On my mtb bikes I use the phenom, for me it's not to comfy. I'm usually in pain anyway. If your slow, you need to look cool. On the road bike I use the Fizik Rodine, it is a comfort performance saddle. Jdog sells Fizik and may be able to get one. They come in 143mm and 150mm. Larger men usually have wider sitbones. I know a little about cycling, but I am an expert with saddles since I have purchased almost everyone. :cry:

Merry Christmas,

RC ... :)
 

Allamuchy Joe

Not White House Approved
JORBA.ORG
im a bigger guy so dinky little saddles are a bit hard for me. can anyone recommend me a good soft saddle thats not a lazyboy? lol

I have the WTB Devo saddle -- it came with my Trance X1. At first I thought that there was no way in hell that would work out because it just looks too thin and uncomfortable. After 2 rides I was hooked. The saddle is great and is probably the most comfortable one I have ever had. It is the OEM one with steel rails, though. I know they make them with TI rails, as well.

One extra bonus -- It is pretty thin, so it is easy to get behind the saddle for those steep downhills. Very nice and I recommend it.

devo.jpg
 

al415

Banned
If you can still find one...

the Titec Berserkr DH was a long and well padded saddle. During my fifteen minutes of being a big DH guy :rofl:, circa 1999, I had one of these on my rocky mtn DH. It was a very comfortable saddle that offered many different seating positions and plenty of cush. They still show up now and then on that auction website, and they'll last forever. I still have my ti-railed version in the basement somewhere.

D_270%20TITBR4.jpg
 

MEAN IRISH GUY

Horse-faced space dog
I have the WTB Devo saddle -- it came with my Trance X1. At first I thought that there was no way in hell that would work out because it just looks too thin and uncomfortable. After 2 rides I was hooked. The saddle is great and is probably the most comfortable one I have ever had. It is the OEM one with steel rails, though. I know they make them with TI rails, as well.

One extra bonus -- It is pretty thin, so it is easy to get behind the saddle for those steep downhills. Very nice and I recommend it.

devo.jpg


haahh this is the seat that comes on the bike im buying(giant trance x2), lol. it was a bit hard for a fella my size thats why i posted this up in the first place. hahahaah.
 

F5000sl

New Member
Saddles are all about personal preference. WTB's make great products to meet the needs of most people and usually are a favorite of mine.

A few things to point out.
~ Most people are affected by saddles rubbing, and even after finding one that feels great, being off the bike for a week can make things uncomfy for a few rides again.

~ Find a saddle where you can feel you tailbones resting on the saddle sides. The main idea of a saddle to support you on the bones and anyone too narrow cuts, too wide spreads.

A huge misconception is that wide = comfy.
A lot of times you can "mask" the symptoms of a saddle fit issue with gel or width, but in the end you will always end up in some discomfort.

~ Another point, adjustments make all the difference.
Make sure to have your saddle as level as possible to start. With all the funny shapes available now, this means making sure high points of the front and rear are level.
I see a lot of folks level by the nose alone and that ends up making a saddle aimed up or tilted far back.

I was on a ride a few years back and after 10mins, I was barely able to sit it hurt that bad and I had 15mls to go still. I stopped and pushed my saddle about 3-5mm forward and OMG, the seat was nothing shy of bliss for the rest of that ride and forward. So small adjustments make all the difference!

Figure out where a saddle hurts you.
Meaning, do you find yourself constantly sliding forward? Backwards?
If so, move the saddle just a few mm in the direction that you move as you're adjusting your body english for a saddle not set correctly.

Lastly, too many folks use the saddle to "fit" a bike.
Meaning, you have about 50mm of movement fore & aft on a saddle, but I see many folks pushing saddles to there limits instead of correcting the real issue, like buying a shorter or longer stem.

In the end, keep you saddle as close to center as possible as it's real intent is to help you align your knees, hips, and feet for a proper and efficient pedal stroke.

Once you have your saddle set up, get a stem that is increased / decreased based on your desired reach to the bars.

I try to stick to a stem from 90-120mm for a XC bike. Going too much farther in either direction really messes with steering feel.

If you find that you are going beyond the limits of a 90-120mm stem and the saddle rail markings, it's possible that the frame you are on is the wrong size for you.

While a lot of shops still sell by seat tube height alone, a more important tube is the toptube for all the reasons listed above.

Sorry for the long post, but I thought I'd share a little bit of the how's and why's seats sometimes feel uncomfy and how complex it can be to set them up.
 

MEAN IRISH GUY

Horse-faced space dog
Saddles are all about personal preference. WTB's make great products to meet the needs of most people and usually are a favorite of mine.

A few things to point out.
~ Most people are affected by saddles rubbing, and even after finding one that feels great, being off the bike for a week can make things uncomfy for a few rides again.

~ Find a saddle where you can feel you tailbones resting on the saddle sides. The main idea of a saddle to support you on the bones and anyone too narrow cuts, too wide spreads.

A huge misconception is that wide = comfy.
A lot of times you can "mask" the symptoms of a saddle fit issue with gel or width, but in the end you will always end up in some discomfort.

~ Another point, adjustments make all the difference.
Make sure to have your saddle as level as possible to start. With all the funny shapes available now, this means making sure high points of the front and rear are level.
I see a lot of folks level by the nose alone and that ends up making a saddle aimed up or tilted far back.

I was on a ride a few years back and after 10mins, I was barely able to sit it hurt that bad and I had 15mls to go still. I stopped and pushed my saddle about 3-5mm forward and OMG, the seat was nothing shy of bliss for the rest of that ride and forward. So small adjustments make all the difference!

Figure out where a saddle hurts you.
Meaning, do you find yourself constantly sliding forward? Backwards?
If so, move the saddle just a few mm in the direction that you move as you're adjusting your body english for a saddle not set correctly.

Lastly, too many folks use the saddle to "fit" a bike.
Meaning, you have about 50mm of movement fore & aft on a saddle, but I see many folks pushing saddles to there limits instead of correcting the real issue, like buying a shorter or longer stem.

In the end, keep you saddle as close to center as possible as it's real intent is to help you align your knees, hips, and feet for a proper and efficient pedal stroke.

Once you have your saddle set up, get a stem that is increased / decreased based on your desired reach to the bars.

I try to stick to a stem from 90-120mm for a XC bike. Going too much farther in either direction really messes with steering feel.

If you find that you are going beyond the limits of a 90-120mm stem and the saddle rail markings, it's possible that the frame you are on is the wrong size for you.

While a lot of shops still sell by seat tube height alone, a more important tube is the toptube for all the reasons listed above.

Sorry for the long post, but I thought I'd share a little bit of the how's and why's seats sometimes feel uncomfy and how complex it can be to set them up.

wow. i dub you sir saddle of jersey for your heaps of saddle knowledge
 
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