Truing Stands

#1
Feels like the time has come to pick up a truing stand. Need to replace wheels on the DH bike and would like to try building my own and also have a road wheel that's a bit out of true. Any recommendations between the feedback stand and the Park stand? Obviously a significant cost difference. I'm usually a "buy it once" guy but wondering how much of a practical difference I'd notice between the two (or other options).
 
#2
I've got the Park and highly recommend. One of its biggest benefits is it's a tank, which means it stays in place when you're working. Also provides truing guide on both sides of the rim. While I've never used I'd question the results you'd get having the wheel supported on only one side.
 
#3
I've got the Park and highly recommend. One of its biggest benefits is it's a tank, which means it stays in place when you're working. Also provides truing guide on both sides of the rim. While I've never used I'd question the results you'd get having the wheel supported on only one side.
I think the Lefty answers any questions from single side support
 
#4
But Lefty forks are designed for Lefty-specific hubs, right? He's looking to tune DH wheels, which are heavy. I'd be dubious of only having support on one side.
 

MadisonDan

Well-Known Member
Team MTBNJ Halter's
#6
I'd be surprised if the one sided design wasn't strong enough. The rotor truing slot is clever I think. Since I've never trued a wheel (or rotor) myself, I wouldn't put too much stock in this post.
 

qclabrat

Well-Known Member
#7
If you're just "trying" it out. Just use the bike frame or fork as the truing stand. Use the right length and new spokes & nipples. Yes, it's easier to have a stand. But how often will you be building or truing wheels. Wheel building tools are the lowest on my list to buy and I build 1-2 sets a year.
 

serviceguy

Well-Known Member
#10
If you're just "trying" it out. Just use the bike frame or fork as the truing stand. Use the right length and new spokes & nipples. Yes, it's easier to have a stand. But how often will you be building or truing wheels. Wheel building tools are the lowest on my list to buy and I build 1-2 sets a year.
While you are correct in your statement, it kind of sounds to me like ‘I only perform brain surgery a couple of times a year, my butcher knife will have to do’ I know, apples and oranges...

Also, if you’re careful buying your components you may end up repaying your stand with your first self built set of wheels.
 

serviceguy

Well-Known Member
#12
For a truing stand one leg is plenty you should be able to gauge trueness from one side
That doesn't necessarily depend by the two legs or one leg, it depends on how the reference system is built. As long as the gauge is on a fixed, constant location referred to the rotating axle it should be fine. It just seems to me that a 1 leg stand is inherently less capable in keeping the axle steady during rotation than a two legged one would be. But again I have a two legged one so I really don't nor need to know about a one legged one.
 
#13
That doesn't necessarily depend by the two legs or one leg, it depends on how the reference system is built. As long as the gauge is on a fixed, constant location referred to the rotating axle it should be fine. It just seems to me that a 1 leg stand is inherently less capable in keeping the axle steady during rotation than a two legged one would be. But again I have a two legged one so I really don't nor need to know about a one legged one.
The thing is there isn't much load so it doesn't require much to keep it from moving around.
 

serviceguy

Well-Known Member
#18
The thing is there isn't much load so it doesn't require much to keep it from moving around.
I was arguing your post about the lefty as not being relevant to the wheel stand having one leg, I never said it wouldn't work.

Have you ever trued a wheel? Or used a truing stand?
Nope but I feel tradition gets in the way of progress.
Spoken like a true millennia,

pontificating about something he knows nothing about!
 

SmooveP

Well-Known Member
#20
The Park TS-2 is built like a tank and has good resale value. Used ones routinely fetch around $200 on eBay, although you can find one for less if you get lucky.