Training for a race tips??

jimvreeland

Shop: Hilltop Bicycles
Shop Keep
#47
I have no clue on race etiquette either...Do I allow people to pass? Or do I run them off into a tree??LOL
Say "on your (side you plan on passing)".

If there is no response, pass on the side you said keeping the opposite elbow leaned towards the rider. A gentle shoulder check will force said rider to learn proper etiquette.

This also works in reverse. If someone says "on your (side they plan to pass)" and you don't respond, don't be surprised if you end up in the woods.
 
#48
Say "on your (side you plan on passing)".

If there is no response, pass on the side you said keeping the opposite elbow leaned towards the rider. A gentle shoulder check will force said rider to learn proper etiquette.

This also works in reverse. If someone says "on your (side they plan to pass)" and you don't respond, don't be surprised if you end up in the woods.
Thank you for splaining “Do the needful”
 

Soundguy

Well-Known Member
#49
Fitness is only half the battle. Lining up and sprinting out of the holeshot in a pack of 20-30 dudes is intense. Until the pack thins out it stays tense. Once the pack thins out and you find your pace it calms down a bit. Falling in with a few guys at the same pace is super fun especially towards the end when it’s time to make a move. General bike skills go a long way, and mechanical is everything. My last race was a total shit show because I borrowed a bike that wasn’t setup right and shifted the chain into the spokes on the first climb...before the pack had thinned. I pissed off a lot of people behind me. It was great.

Edit: I haven’t been in race shape in a long time so yeah fitness matters. Just don’t get too focused on that alone.
 

mtbiker87

Well-Known Member
#51
Wow..I come from a BMX, and then motorsport back ground. No one..EVER...asked to pass...you just did it. I'm not sure I'd be very well liked ..lol. Unlearning years of mental/muscle memory might take awhile.
 
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qclabrat

Well-Known Member
#52
Only done a few races, and my suggestion is not to line up in the back unless you truly want to finish last
Go mid pack and push your limits. I've never ridden with you, but try CAT3 first and upgrade as needed. CAT3 tends to have a lot of guys/gals going out fast, but after a 2-3 miles they start to settle into groups. Find your group and call out your passes when ready.
 
#53
Wow..I come from a BMX, and then motorsport back ground. No one..EVER...asked to pass...you just did it. I'm not sure I'd be very well liked ..lol. Unlearning years of mental/muscle memory might take awhile.
BMX - its strange if someone isn’t trying to force you over the berm... different genres different rules
 

graveyardman67

Well-Known Member
Team MTBNJ Halter's
#55
Wow..I come from a BMX, and then motorsport background. No one..EVER...asked to pass...you just did it. I'm not sure I'd be very well liked ..lol. Unlearning years of mental/muscle memory might take awhile.
Yeah well, very different things going on. 10 foot wide track (minimum) compared to single track with rocks and trees everywhere. As a general courtesy, it would be good to be cognizant of letting people know you intend to pass or giving some room when others intend to do the passing. I raced BMX and MX before that and had no issue with mental/muscle memory. I'm sure you will figure it out.
 

SmooveP

Well-Known Member
#56
Do a race out of state where nobody knows you. That way, if you DFL, your friends won't be able to mock you. Downside is that you lose the incentive provided by fear of mockery.
 

shrpshtr325

Infinite Source of Sarcasm
Team MTBNJ Halter's
#59
damn, i was gonna say start 3 months or more before your race :/

guess im a little late the advice party