The DIY thread - DIYourself

qclabrat

Well-Known Member
Almost 200k still youngish for a Honda. As of late I'm driving a 5 series for the warm seasons since it's got summer tires and rwd, except to ride my bike and weekly trips into NYC. In the winter it's my only ride. So 6-7k a yr for the past few years.
IMG_20181211_071752.jpg
 

jmanic

JORBA Board Member/Chapter Leader
Staff member
JORBA.ORG
Team MTBNJ Halter's
What Max said - trapping the moisture overhead might not be the best idea - just stop most of the convection - maybe with rock wool?
Funny, I have some organic packing material (growler shipment) that looks a lot like that.
Will give that a throw.
 

shrpshtr325

Infinite Source of Sarcasm
not really surprised, 300k should easily be possible with minor repairs on most modern engines, we arent living in the 60s anymore machining tolerances are much better and more consistent.
 

qclabrat

Well-Known Member
not really surprised, 300k should easily be possible with minor repairs on most modern engines, we arent living in the 60s anymore machining tolerances are much better and more consistent.
I've had auto trans problems with every Honda I've owned including an Integral. Only one without an issue was a Legend and that one had the typical rusted out quarter panels
 

THATmanMANNY

Well-Known Member
@fidodie
the only code I know is
Up, Up, Down, Down, Left, Right, Left, Right, B, A, Start.

Goof up but the sub floor is down for good (well anything is demo-able)... I was at a point of well, let's just move on! If it requires to demo the sub floor I will but I can still make this work.
 

shrpshtr325

Infinite Source of Sarcasm
For me to hit 200K on a car, I'd have to drive it for 20+ years (just got rid of an '04 Subaru. 14 years, 120K miles). Yeah, the engines and transmissions can easily go the distance these days, but age and rust usually start to give you troubles.

lucky you, ill be there in 10 at the rate iv been driving.
 

fidodie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
@fidodie
the only code I know is
Up, Up, Down, Down, Left, Right, Left, Right, B, A, Start.

Goof up but the sub floor is down for good (well anything is demo-able)... I was at a point of well, let's just move on! If it requires to demo the sub floor I will but I can still make this work.
i can't find any tool to tighten this below the floor level.

can you come at it from below? or from behind a wall (another room or closet?)

it doesn't have to be really tight given the orientation.
 

THATmanMANNY

Well-Known Member
No. Also, I tested the tub’s T drain setup too. There is some gap between the SS pipes and nuts it slides into. Do you suggest some teflon tape wrap over the pipe where it contacts the sealing nuts.

OTOH, what is the best toilet set kit? Just looking set a cheap standard bowl toilet.
 

fidodie

Well-Known Member
Staff member
No. Also, I tested the tub’s T drain setup too. There is some gap between the SS pipes and nuts it slides into. Do you suggest some teflon tape wrap over the pipe where it contacts the sealing nuts.

OTOH, what is the best toilet set kit? Just looking set a cheap standard bowl toilet.
may have the wrong size nut ? they should fit snuggley before tightening.

you may be able to convert to a threaded chrome pipe below the floor, then add the trap adapter on top of that....
i know you don't want to demo, the trap adapter is probably NPT, so add above that?


toilets are cheap, buy it from plumbing supply. two piece are easier to deal with, 1 piece is easier to clean.
 

shrpshtr325

Infinite Source of Sarcasm
my dad had to use the non wax one in the main bath in their house, why? because it was almost directly over the woodstove (whic is in the unfinished basement) the heat from the stove running 24/7 all winter was melting the wax seals and they were leaking through the floor . . .never had a problem after switching over.
 

iman29

Well-Known Member
i tried the non wax kit during my recent toilet flange replacement fiasco and found it made the bowl too high off the ground. I did not want to shim the bowl and have a huge caulk line around it so I went back to the wax ring. That being said it could just be my specific situation and I would have preferred the non wax one for reuse purposes if it worked out.
 

THATmanMANNY

Well-Known Member
thank you. Saw that one. I'll give it a go. First time toilet installer here.

Another topic...
I am dealing with an nightmare plumbing situation. Tuesday, one of the cleaning ladies (I am very anti household cleaning crews but because we welcomed a new BABY boy my wife needs some help) got a brush stuck in the toilet and attempted to flush it down... first, WTF? Now that item is stuck in the drain line somewhere in the outside drain line to septic tank. Shit, literally, is backing through the downstairs toilet. Thought it was fixed yesterday but issue again this morning. I'm at work on the edge of my seat while my wife is at home and the plumber is about two hours out. The cleaning business is paying for the plumber yesterday and today. Dunno just had to share.