Stuck post in carbon frame

#1
My seat post is frozen in my carbon framed Trek 9.7, What's worse, it's a dropper post that occasionally needs disassembly and cleaning to function. Anyone have experience with un-freezing a post in a carbon frame? Don't know if I can use the usual stuff (WD-40, PB Blaster, heat/cold). Any help is appreciated.
Thanks,
MW
 
#2
My seat post is frozen in my carbon framed Trek 9.7, What's worse, it's a dropper post that occasionally needs disassembly and cleaning to function. Anyone have experience with un-freezing a post in a carbon frame? Don't know if I can use the usual stuff (WD-40, PB Blaster, heat/cold). Any help is appreciated.
Thanks,
MW
Relatively new bike? I got a new frame for my Horsethief for the exact same thing - lbs couldn't get the busted dropper post out, so new frame.
 

Jmann

Well-Known Member
#6
Man, usually hear about this with aluminum post in a steel frame. Carbon fiber doesn’t expand like metal when heat is applied, so the old trick of freezing then heating the frame doesn’t apply. I don’t have any good advice, but curious what others have to say. I’ve always had success with industrial Aero kroil penetrating fluid on metal, so penetrating fluid is my usual go to. But no carbon experience.
 
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THATmanMANNY

Well-Known Member
#7
FLIPSIDE. This happened to my alum road bike and carbon post. Don't know if it's recommended but I did use WD-40 and let it sit a couple days. Spraying a couple times a day from the top and bottom (removed threaded bottom bracket). It eventually came out but the carbon post was FUBAR.

you are going to need some kind of oil/lube. You may get better leverage by putting the post in a vice grip or stand that fits it and rotating the frame. JUST DO IT. Good luck and report back. :popcorn:
 
#9
My seat post is frozen in my carbon framed Trek 9.7, What's worse, it's a dropper post that occasionally needs disassembly and cleaning to function. Anyone have experience with un-freezing a post in a carbon frame? Don't know if I can use the usual stuff (WD-40, PB Blaster, heat/cold). Any help is appreciated.
Thanks,
MW
i have had to tackle this one quite a few times. Ammonia did the trick when it was aluminum to carbon. You can typically pick it up and any supermarket or hardware store. Best of luck.
 

knobbyhead

Well-Known Member
#12
Pics, or this tool does not exist.

Meanwhile, I'm gonna loosen my post clamp and move it around a bit.
Not sure if you are serious.
It's a secret, I'm sure he's not telling. I read about one guy on the interwebs, removing seat posts is his full-time job. He developed 2 tools for the job and he is tight lipped at what they are. Apparently he has close too 100% success rate at saving frames. Seat posts not so much.
I hope before he dies he gets an apprentice.

And here he is: http://theseatpostman.com/
 
#15
Not sure if you are serious.
It's a secret, I'm sure he's not telling. I read about one guy on the interwebs, removing seat posts is his full-time job. He developed 2 tools for the job and he is tight lipped at what they are. Apparently he has close too 100% success rate at saving frames. Seat posts not so much.
I hope before he dies he gets an apprentice.

And here he is: http://theseatpostman.com/
Makes me wonder if bikes are air tight if you cap everything off and pressurize the seat tube out
 

RobW

Well-Known Member
#16
Makes me wonder if bikes are air tight if you cap everything off and pressurize the seat tube out
Since it’s nested in there good, you may be able to shoot high pressure air through a small rubber nozzle adapter between the post and seat tube there is a chance to loosen it... used to use that technique to de-nest containers that were out of spec.
 

jdog

Shop: Halter's Cycles
Shop Keep
#17
Since it’s nested in there good, you may be able to shoot high pressure air through a small rubber nozzle adapter between the post and seat tube there is a chance to loosen it... used to use that technique to de-nest containers that were out of spec.
No chance on that technique. You would get a blow by of air but that wouldn’t break the post free. This is often Galvanic corrosion which is a chemical bond.

I’ve finally found a set of tools that works most of the time, but sometimes you still break a post and have to Caveman the rest out.
 

Xler8

Well-Known Member
#18
Always lube your post... no matter the frame material. The alternative is to keep the post free from binding by simply loosening it and giving it a 1/4 or 1/8 of a turn now and then....
 
#19
Not sure if you are serious.
It's a secret, I'm sure he's not telling. I read about one guy on the interwebs, removing seat posts is his full-time job. He developed 2 tools for the job and he is tight lipped at what they are. Apparently he has close too 100% success rate at saving frames. Seat posts not so much.
I hope before he dies he gets an apprentice.

And here he is: http://theseatpostman.com/
Thanks, good site but he's in England. Would have to ship the frame there. Might be worth it if all else fails.