Setup Tubeless

rxpxskier

Active Member
#1
Like the title, i went and got all the stuff to set up my wheels, they were tubeless ready so that made it easy. The whole process went smoothly, took the bike for a spin and the tires held air over night. Is that it? I didnt have any seepage, but the tires/wheels are essentially brand new and i set the bead with a compressor before adding the sealant. I know i have to check the tires and replace the sealant 4-6 months.
 

Magic

Formerly 1sh0t1b33r
Team MTBNJ Halter's
#5
That's it! The best thing, I find, for a new tubeless setup is to just fill it to your usual air pressure and take it out for a regular mountain bike ride. This will get the sealant to coat the entire inside of the tire and the sealant will work its way into any bead leaks. A quick spin on the driveway usually isn't enough as some tires have a slimy coating inside, and no need to do the whole leaving the tire on its side overnight if you just ride it. If you see any small leaks right away, just bring your pump with you as they'll likely be sealed in some time.

When I set up my Stan's Crest wheels for the first time, I mounted and inflated the tires and they held air for two days until I got my sealant in. Quality wheels and tires will certainly make everything easier as well.
 

qclabrat

Well-Known Member
#6
did you get the pop sound? Some times they need a fair amount of pressure to seat. At times fearfully high, where you're hoping to a divine being that you don't get sealant all over you. I usually set them sideways overnight and rotate the over direction for another day for new setups. But riding the bike for another day may be enough as well. Just monitor the tire pressures. If you are getting abnormally low in a few months, it may be time too replenish the sealant.
 

rxpxskier

Active Member
#7
That's it! The best thing, I find, for a new tubeless setup is to just fill it to your usual air pressure and take it out for a regular mountain bike ride. This will get the sealant to coat the entire inside of the tire and the sealant will work its way into any bead leaks. A quick spin on the driveway usually isn't enough as some tires have a slimy coating inside, and no need to do the whole leaving the tire on its side overnight if you just ride it. If you see any small leaks right away, just bring your pump with you as they'll likely be sealed in some time.

When I set up my Stan's Crest wheels for the first time, I mounted and inflated the tires and they held air for two days until I got my sealant in. Quality wheels and tires will certainly make everything easier as well.
exactly when i did, took a 3 mile loop on a gravel road when i was done.
 

rxpxskier

Active Member
#9
You did it wrong, replace with Stans wheels;)
lol in time.

did you get the pop sound? Some times they need a fair amount of pressure to seat. At times fearfully high, where you're hoping to a divine being that you don't get sealant all over you. I usually set them sideways overnight and rotate the over direction for another day for new setups. But riding the bike for another day may be enough as well. Just monitor the tire pressures. If you are getting abnormally low in a few months, it may be time too replenish the sealant.
yep, pops on each side of the wheel. used my compressor set to like 70lbs to set bead.
 

Magic

Formerly 1sh0t1b33r
Team MTBNJ Halter's
#10
That's about 20-30lbs too much. If it's not popping, use soapy water on the bead. If the tire snaps at those pressures, you could blow the lip of the rim off. Some wheels, especially those without a center channel, may not make the popping sound. Just spin the wheel to check if it's seated correctly once you get to ~40psi.