Saddle Position

ytc100

New Member
#1
I've been reading a bit about saddle position. From you more experienced riders who may have experimented with saddle position:

Does the plumb line from the knee method have any merit?
What other factors would you consider in adjusting your saddle - especially fore/aft?
 

jdog

Shop: Halter's Cycles
Shop Keep
#3
Kops

Knee
Over
Pedal
Spindle



To much info to type but you are on the right track.

In general I see most folks with their saddle too low and too far back.

Also make sure that the saddle sits level or pointed down slightly.

Prostatitus is a very bad thing.. Had it. Make sure that your weight is on the pelvic bones and not on the "taint". Saddles that work for some are miserable to others.

Totally my opinion.

Sometime with full-suspension the saddle must be pointed down as the nose of the saddle may rise as the bike moves through the travel.


Read all you can and then read some more on this.

Most every Fit guide is slightly different and there is no one right answer.

I used the "Fit Kit" and the Serrota "Size cycle" for year before I realized that they both lacked some vital flexibility.




Best of luck J_
 

ChrisG

Unapologetic Lifer for Rock and Roll
#4
jdog said:
Knee
Over
Pedal
Spindle
Second what J. says.

I've been using the plumb line method, measuring from the front edge of the kneecap, for a long time. A couple of other random thoughts: Always make changes in saddle position (hell, ANY element of your position on the bike) in small increments. A drastic change before a 3 hour ride could be pretty ugly. If you have more than one bike, take measurements and strive to get things as close as possible. This includes reach, because the angle of your back will effect the rotational position of your hips.

Have a good time, all the time.:D
 

ytc100

New Member
#6
Thanks for the replies. I don't have any comfort issues, I am trying to maximize my efficiency as it was suggested to me that my saddle position could be effecting my overall endurance. :)

Going to experiement a bit. I noticed my 2 bikes are pretty different. One a 17" hardtail, the other an 18" full suss. Putting them next to eachother it looks like there would be no way to get them the same. All else being equal the larger frame has a longer reach even with a shorter stem than the hardtail. I do a lot more standing on the hardtail as it's my single speed. Does this effect fit?

I know, lots of questions and few answers. ;)
 

Norm

Mayor McCheese
Team MTBNJ Halter's
#7
If you push big gears, you can move the saddle back a bit from the KOPS adage. But not too much.

In general you want a good "zero" spot so you can inch forward or backwards depending on the terrain. And you always need to be able to drop your butt off the back of the seat on those fun descents.

Before you do that, though, you should really be making sure the saddle height is correct.
 

ChrisG

Unapologetic Lifer for Rock and Roll
#8
ytc100 said:
Thanks for the replies. I don't have any comfort issues, I am trying to maximize my efficiency as it was suggested to me that my saddle position could be effecting my overall endurance. :)

Going to experiement a bit. I noticed my 2 bikes are pretty different. One a 17" hardtail, the other an 18" full suss. Putting them next to eachother it looks like there would be no way to get them the same. All else being equal the larger frame has a longer reach even with a shorter stem than the hardtail. I do a lot more standing on the hardtail as it's my single speed. Does this effect fit?

I know, lots of questions and few answers. ;)
My singlespeed is an old-school geometry (early 90's) frame with a shortish top tube and a 130mm stem, while my full sus is contemporary geometry, longer top tube and 120mm stem. The saddle rail to pedal distance is the same, as are the reach to the bars from the saddle and the bottom bracket drop. It takes a while to get these things dialed in, but it's nice to be able to go from bike to bike and not have to readapt to different positions. My knees in particular are happy about this.
 

Norm

Mayor McCheese
Team MTBNJ Halter's
#9
ChrisG said:
It takes a while to get these things dialed in, but it's nice to be able to go from bike to bike and not have to readapt to different positions. My knees in particular are happy about this.
I have 3 bikes I actively use (road, mtb, trainer) and they all have different fits. Thankfully, the longest rides are on the mtb and that is my best fit, most comfortable. I really need to work out all the details of fitting all my bikes better this offseason. My trainer bike is actually my old mtb, and the fit is all f'ed up. I have about 6 inches of wood blocks under the front wheel to make it more comfortable.
 
E

Evil

Guest
#10
Prostatitus is the absolute worst.
No matter what you do with seat position for any reason, keep the taint happy.
Also, change position in your saddle often.
I know this is slightly "off-topic" but for real, I woulden't wish this crap on my worst enemy.
Be carefull fellas!
 

bonefishjake

Strong like bull, smart like tractor
Team MTBNJ Halter's
#11
i adjust the seat height so that there is a little slack in knee at the bottom of the pedal stroke to prevent hyper-extension. after that, if i'm not in pain i don't touch anything. i'm pretty sure more time on the bike would net me better results than a few mm in seat change.
 
#12
bonefishjake said:
i adjust the seat height so that there is a little slack in knee at the bottom of the pedal stroke to prevent hyper-extension. after that, if i'm not in pain i don't touch anything. i'm pretty sure more time on the bike would net me better results than a few mm in seat change.
I've used the heel on the pedal until your leg is straight at the bottom of the pedal stroke method to adjust seat height. This leaves my knee slightly bent at the bottom of the pedal stroke when clipped in.

I agree that more time in the saddle would benefit my endurance but if a few mm makes even a small difference wouldn't you want to take advantage of that? I feel like over hours of pedaling those small differences add up.
 
#13
Evil said:
Prostatitus is the absolute worst.
No matter what you do with seat position for any reason, keep the taint happy.
Also, change position in your saddle often.
I know this is slightly "off-topic" but for real, I woulden't wish this crap on my worst enemy.
Be carefull fellas!
I have had prostatitus but I didn't get it from riding my bike! ;)
 

Norm

Mayor McCheese
Team MTBNJ Halter's
#14
ytc100 said:
I agree that more time in the saddle would benefit my endurance but if a few mm makes even a small difference wouldn't you want to take advantage of that? I feel like over hours of pedaling those small differences add up.
After I cramped during the Allamuchy race, the guy I was riding with told me to raise my saddle - he does it and it helps him. Seriously, less than an inch and it felt like I had a whole new set of muscles helping out the cause.
 

bonefishjake

Strong like bull, smart like tractor
Team MTBNJ Halter's
#15
normZurawski said:
After I cramped during the Allamuchy race, the guy I was riding with told me to raise my saddle - he does it and it helps him. Seriously, less than an inch and it felt like I had a whole new set of muscles helping out the cause.
i keep forgetting how much small, and i mean small, changes in my lifting used to help me. a slight lean back in a dead lift or tucking your elbows into your lats on a bench press make all the difference in the world...and it is literally a matter of inches. why i didn't think this would apply to a bike, i have no idea. ignorance i guess...and the fact that i still, after being back on my bike for the second season, don't consider myself a biker. single speed masher, yes. spinner? nope. not this guy.

ok, sott, you've got my attention. i'm waiting for enlightenment (norm, you can help too). :D :D :D
 

jdog

Shop: Halter's Cycles
Shop Keep
#18
Imo

In my opinion..

Since I saw you on your bike...

This is what I would do to your bike.

Push the saddle forwad 1-2cm

Cut 1" total off your bars.

Remove all the spacers form under the stem to lower the front end.

Get a 1cm shorter stem.



That is just a basic idea but without working with you on a trainer it would be hard to say for sure.



J
 

bonefishjake

Strong like bull, smart like tractor
Team MTBNJ Halter's
#19
jdog said:
In my opinion..

Since I saw you on your bike...

This is what I would do to your bike.

Push the saddle forwad 1-2cm

Cut 1" total off your bars.

Remove all the spacers form under the stem to lower the front end.

Get a 1cm shorter stem.



That is just a basic idea but without working with you on a trainer it would be hard to say for sure.



J
me or yct?