Raritan 911: Robocop

Carson

Sport Bacon
Team MTBNJ Halter's
Anyways. Today...

I answer a routine EMS call and one of the EMTs on the ambulance is also a young police officer in a neighboring town. He's a good kid but still pretty green.

We are at a residence for a fall victim. Elderly man with a host of medical issues. The EMT begins assessing for a head injury.

EMT: Do you know what day of the week it is?
Patient: It's Wednesday.
EMT: Do you know who the president is?
Patient: Trump.
EMT: Are those dents in your forehead normal?
Me: What?
EMT: Those dents... are they normal?
Me: Seriously?
EMT: Well, I don't know. They could be normal.
Me: So you've seen normal dents in people's heads?
EMT: That's not what I meant.
Me: That's what you said. What did you really mean?
EMT: Sir, did you have those dents in your head before you fell today?
Me: Ah! Much better.
Patient: Yes, they are from an old injury.
Me: But they aren't normal, sir, are they?
EMT: Ok, we've got everything under control here if you want to leave, Dave.
Me: I dunno. Sir, are you comfortable with me leaving you in the care of someone who thinks your head dents are normal?
Patient: (Laughing) Yes, I think I'll be okay.
 

stilluf

Well-Known Member
You talk back and disobey a direct order from a police officer you get what you deserve. Stick time.
I've never met @Carson , but I definitely enjoy his hilarious (and sometimes sad) posts on his daily experience as a police officer. Since he posted the video, I'm assuming he's OK with a discussion on the topic of police use of force. I've been thinking about this post and the video quite a bit over the past few days, so wanted to add my two cents.

I know that each situation is different, and that cops face a daily risk of injury (or worse). But just because someone doesn't do exactly what an officer commands should not mean that it is a license to use the "stick", or the taser, etc. Please note that I'm not commenting in any way on the events in the video, most of which is off-camera and probably does not tell the entire story (like most videos showing alleged excessive force). However, it seems to me that we need to have a serious re-evaluation of the standards for use of force, specifically in the context of non-compliance with a police order.

Would love to get the perspectives of anyone in law enforcement. In your view, when is force permissible and how do you determine the appropriate level of force? Are there any changes you'd like to see?
 

Magic

Formerly 1sh0t1b33r
Team MTBNJ Halter's
I've never met @Carson , but I definitely enjoy his hilarious (and sometimes sad) posts on his daily experience as a police officer. Since he posted the video, I'm assuming he's OK with a discussion on the topic of police use of force. I've been thinking about this post and the video quite a bit over the past few days, so wanted to add my two cents.

I know that each situation is different, and that cops face a daily risk of injury (or worse). But just because someone doesn't do exactly what an officer commands should not mean that it is a license to use the "stick", or the taser, etc. Please note that I'm not commenting in any way on the events in the video, most of which is off-camera and probably does not tell the entire story (like most videos showing alleged excessive force). However, it seems to me that we need to have a serious re-evaluation of the standards for use of force, specifically in the context of non-compliance with a police order.

Would love to get the perspectives of anyone in law enforcement. In your view, when is force permissible and how do you determine the appropriate level of force? Are there any changes you'd like to see?
As much as people say it's wrong to use force, I haven't seen anyone post alternatives. Almost all of the issues arise from people not obeying a simple command. Usually, it's because they know they did something wrong or are hiding something. Would you just keep yelling at the guy until the end of your shift, and call in officer two to take over yelling?
 

Mahnken

Well-Known Member
As much as people say it's wrong to use force, I haven't seen anyone post alternatives. Almost all of the issues arise from people not obeying a simple command. Usually, it's because they know they did something wrong or are hiding something. Would you just keep yelling at the guy until the end of your shift, and call in officer two to take over yelling?
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