DIY spinoff - tools thread

rlb

Well-Known Member
#1
Looking to get a cordless 1/2 impact gun. I've invested in the Dewalt 20v stuff so that's where I'm staying. Anyone have either of these?

The second one is a behemoth that weighs as much as a brick. This will mostly be used for tire rotations and car repairs, so I'm wondering if I'd miss the extra power if I went with the lighter/easier to handle tool. On the other hand, I feel like an impact gun is a "go big or go home" kind of tool.

https://www.homedepot.com/p/DEWALT-...-Detent-Pin-Anvil-Tool-Only-DCF894B/304050995
https://www.homedepot.com/p/DEWALT-...-Detent-Pin-Anvil-Tool-Only-DCF899B/206159781
 

one piece crank

Well-Known Member
#2
After your purchase, post a follow-up report. I'd like to know what you think of these.

I have just enough compressor to run modest air tools - typically only used for difficult disassembly tasks. Re-assembly is always by hand and torqued-up.
 

shrpshtr325

Infinite Source of Sarcasm
#3
i have the dewalt 20v 1/2 impact, when i bought it they only had one, but it looks like the 700ft-lb model you show, plenty of power for tires/brakes type of stuff. I keep it in the truck under the seat with my spare tire kit in case . . . .

i tend to use my air stuff when im home, but i had this first and no complaints, it will take more hits to break tougher fasteners free than my air gun will but thats almost twice as much torque.

If you want to give it a try LMK its always in the truck
 

clarkenstein

JORBA Money Launderer
JORBA.ORG
#4
My impact is corded - for higher amp tools I prefer corded stuff for two reasons - the first is the batteries sit around so long they get weak since I don’t use the tool frequently as a homeowner. Second is I feel I get better power with the corded tools especially if I’m using it for a while.
 

shrpshtr325

Infinite Source of Sarcasm
#5
My impact is corded - for higher amp tools I prefer corded stuff for two reasons - the first is the batteries sit around so long they get weak since I don’t use the tool frequently as a homeowner. Second is I feel I get better power with the corded tools especially if I’m using it for a while.

lithium ion batteries hold their charge at >80% for over a year and if you use the same battery system for all your tools they will never sit that long (unless you are the type to pay for anything that needs to be done, but if so why own the tools?). The Lithium batteries also dont fade out like NiCd or NiMH batteries do, they provide consistent power over 90% of the packs capacity, only near the very end do i notice any drop off in power on my drills or anything. I dont disagree about more power being possible with corded stuff, but for the convenience and uses that a typical homeowner (even a very DIY oriented one) will have, the Lithium ion battery tools are plenty (only exception i have found is circular saws, the just suck a battery dry like a frat house draining a keg)
 

Patrick

aka Fidodie
Staff member
#6
i got the 1/2" socket adapter stuck in my 18v ryobi driver (the one for doing screws) - so i've been using that when needed.
there was a refurb impact wrench at HD a few months back, and i couldn't justify it. if it is tight, i use a breaker bar to start. can't get more torque then a long bar with a standing leg press.

on the other hand, i've been eyeballing the battery op nail guns.
 

Patrick

aka Fidodie
Staff member
#7
lithium ion batteries hold their charge at >80% for over a year and if you use the same battery system for all your tools they will never sit that long (unless you are the type to pay for anything that needs to be done, but if so why own the tools?). The Lithium batteries also dont fade out like NiCd or NiMH batteries do, they provide consistent power over 90% of the packs capacity, only near the very end do i notice any drop off in power on my drills or anything. I dont disagree about more power being possible with corded stuff, but for the convenience and uses that a typical homeowner (even a very DIY oriented one) will have, the Lithium ion battery tools are plenty (only exception i have found is circular saws, the just suck a battery dry like a frat house draining a keg)
trick with circular saws is to have a sharp blade.
and the sawzall with the limb cutting blade may come in handy.....
 

RobW

Well-Known Member
#8
i think you would be able to use the smaller one around the house for home wrenching.... if theres a stuck bolt that it cant get off, there is always a breaker bar.... seldom would you ever need more than 300ft lbs for a bolt on a car

edit- if youre the only one doing work on the car, then it should work for both installing and uninstalling bolts... remember proper bolt care and anti-seize will alleviate future problems.
 

shrpshtr325

Infinite Source of Sarcasm
#9
trick with circular saws is to have a sharp blade.
and the sawzall with the limb cutting blade may come in handy.....

i keep eyeing up the compact one for the dewalt 20v system, advertised to fit between standard width studs . .. . . . i have a full size corded so hard to justify >$120 for another one . . . :/
 

Patrick

aka Fidodie
Staff member
#10
i keep eyeing up the compact one for the dewalt 20v system, advertised to fit between standard width studs . .. . . . i have a full size corded so hard to justify >$120 for another one . . . :/
nothing beats grabbing a 5.5" circular saw for a quick cross-cut.
 

rlb

Well-Known Member
#14
i have the dewalt 20v 1/2 impact, when i bought it they only had one, but it looks like the 700ft-lb model you show, plenty of power for tires/brakes type of stuff. I keep it in the truck under the seat with my spare tire kit in case . . . .

i tend to use my air stuff when im home, but i had this first and no complaints, it will take more hits to break tougher fasteners free than my air gun will but thats almost twice as much torque.

If you want to give it a try LMK its always in the truck
Thanks for the offer. Reading the reviews on the bigger gun I'm sure it'll be more than I need, I guess I'm just trying to decide if I'll regret getting the smaller one.

My impact is corded - for higher amp tools I prefer corded stuff for two reasons - the first is the batteries sit around so long they get weak since I don’t use the tool frequently as a homeowner. Second is I feel I get better power with the corded tools especially if I’m using it for a while.
As @shrpshtr325 said the newer stuff is great. I also have the 1/4 impact driver, drill, hedge trimmer weed wacker, and leaf blower and just 3 batteries. So they seldom sit unused aside from this time of year.

i think you would be able to use the smaller one around the house for home wrenching.... if theres a stuck bolt that it cant get off, there is always a breaker bar.... seldom would you ever need more than 300ft lbs for a bolt on a car

edit- if youre the only one doing work on the car, then it should work for both installing and uninstalling bolts... remember proper bolt care and anti-seize will alleviate future problems.
Agreed on all fronts here. My older car is a 2006 so there's going to be some crusty bolts on occasion. In that case, they'd probably wind up snapping past the 300ft lb point anyway...
 

rlb

Well-Known Member
#15
i got the 1/2" socket adapter stuck in my 18v ryobi driver (the one for doing screws) - so i've been using that when needed.
there was a refurb impact wrench at HD a few months back, and i couldn't justify it. if it is tight, i use a breaker bar to start. can't get more torque then a long bar with a standing leg press.

on the other hand, i've been eyeballing the battery op nail guns.
Tire rotations though....so much easier.

trick with circular saws is to have a sharp blade.
and the sawzall with the limb cutting blade may come in handy.....
We talking arms or branches?

looking out for a cheap refurb, if i can get it under $60 id probably jump
Where do you pick up the refurbs?
 

shrpshtr325

Infinite Source of Sarcasm
#16
Where do you pick up the refurbs?
home depot/lowes have them on occasion (i think they are actually returns, but rarely a problem, and you test them immediately and return again if bad)

but amazon wharehouse deals and amazon in general, still covered by the a-z guarantee. I actually havent bought any dewalt from amazon refurbishers, but everything else i have comes in basically new . . .

Thanks for the offer. Reading the reviews on the bigger gun I'm sure it'll be more than I need, I guess I'm just trying to decide if I'll regret getting the smaller one.

Agreed on all fronts here. My older car is a 2006 so there's going to be some crusty bolts on occasion. In that case, they'd probably wind up snapping past the 300ft lb point anyway...
honestly, unless you are going into gear work and engine rebuilds, probably not going to have any problem, but it will get anything off that you need, iv even used mine on stubborn pedals (make sure you have it spinning in the right direction first ;) )

the only thing mine has failed at is the lug nuts after the tire place put them on with their air guns, but my air gun didnt even flinch so . . . .
 

olegbabich

Well-Known Member
#19
I have Dewalt DCF894HB and have not use my older corded tool in years.

Great torque and weight.

It has a Hog Ring Anvil that sometimes makes it hard to install and take off the sockets.
 

shrpshtr325

Infinite Source of Sarcasm
#20
I have Dewalt DCF894HB and have not use my older corded tool in years.

Great torque and weight.

It has a Hog Ring Anvil that sometimes makes it hard to install and take off the sockets.

the Hog Ring will always be easier than the detent pin (IME, the detent pin on mine you almost need a punch to press in and remove the socket)