Any scotch/whisky drinkers in here?

qclabrat

Well-Known Member
#41
[GALLERY=media, 78]Kilbeggan Irish by qclabrat posted Mar 28, 2015 at 10:55 PM[/GALLERY]Day 1
Starting off with an economical Irish whiskey
Kilbeggan blended

Very light and easy to drink
Though lacks complexities which is not uncommon for Irish, even a few drops of water didn't do much to open it
Good alternative to Jameson if you want something that goes down easier
No cigars or peanuts with this one, as you'll lose the aroma
 

The Kalmyk

Well-Known Member
#44
My grandfather and I were close like father and son... So my grandmother got me this for as a Xmas present and said it was his favorite.

I was thinking shots of this stuff but apparently after some internet searching it meant to be sipped and enjoyed.
 

jmanic

JORBA Board Member/Chapter Leader
Staff member
JORBA.ORG
Team MTBNJ Halter's
#47
My grandfather and I were close like father and son... So my grandmother got me this for as a Xmas present and said it was his favorite.

I was thinking shots of this stuff but apparently after some internet searching it meant to be sipped and enjoyed.
He had good taste. Definitely sip it and think of him.
 

qclabrat

Well-Known Member
#48
[GALLERY=media, 85]Ardbeg Islay by qclabrat posted Mar 29, 2015 at 10:12 PM[/GALLERY]

Blair, perfect segue to the next selection

Day 2, Ardbeg, my favorite of all Islays

Widely considered the peatiest and harshest to drink by some standards, even my wife won't touch it, though she likes Lag

You wouldn't expect the peatiness in such a delicate colored scotch, but man does it pack a punch. Perfect accompaniment to a mild cigar like a Romeo Y Julieta, just make sure to add a few drops of water and even have it sunbathe a few minutes to warm up and break the surface tensions to unlock the smells.

I was introduced to Ardbeg a few years back when I visited a the Glen Moray distillery near Elgin, Scotland. Definitely a journeyman's drink, I never have more than one at a time. The complexities are similar to the lingering flavors you have after exhaling a good cigar. Each inhale, notice the intentional tall glass, and sip has a lasting sensation which very slowly dissipates. If I'm not smoking a cigar like tonight, I can taste the peat on the roof of my mouth, several minutes after each sip.

Crazy good scotch but not crazy expensive, you'll see my 10 day selections won't be exclusive runs, and relatively affordable. After 3 days of whisky/whiskey, I'll be moving to something different tomorrow.
 

qclabrat

Well-Known Member
#49
[GALLERY=media, 86]Inca Pisco by qclabrat posted Mar 30, 2015 at 7:36 PM[/GALLERY]Okay day 3, something different
Inca Pisco from Peru

Another memory from the past, in high school my buddy would swip this from his parents while I'd do the water down to my parent's Remy. I get a bottle of this every time he goes to Peru.

For those who don't know Pisco, it's a brandy made with grapes. The Inca brand is known for its characteristic black man bottles.

This Pisco is colorless and generally smooth and easy to drink. Though not the typical traits for this liquor, which is usually very aromatic and a good burn going down. I find the it very similar to an extra dry grey goose martini. Chilled or straight up makes a nice casual drink, but most will order at bars in a Pisco Sour version
 

Magic

Formerly 1sh0t1b33r
Team MTBNJ Halter's
#50
I have a few Macallans, 12 and 15. Teaspoon of water, if that. I'll have some rarely, but I prefer Jack or bourbons on ice. Usually stick to Belgian beer most of the time anyway.
 

seanrunnette

Brain Damaged Ray Romano
Team MTBNJ Halter's
#51
That's one of my favorites. Nothing can beat some Oban though. Nothing.
I'm partial to Caol Ila. Peaty w/out the medicine-y kick of Laphroig (not that there's ANYTHING wrong with Laphroig).
Caol Ila.jpeg Never saw the sense in adding water to it, though I know it's s'posed to help. I weep over the cost. Sometimes that gets into the glass, so there's that. There's a company that sells Islay water to make into ice cubes, should you want to go insane over this...
 

jmanic

JORBA Board Member/Chapter Leader
Staff member
JORBA.ORG
Team MTBNJ Halter's
#52
I'm partial to Caol Ila. Peaty w/out the medicine-y kick of Laphroig (not that there's ANYTHING wrong with Laphroig).
View attachment 20309 Never saw the sense in adding water to it, though I know it's s'posed to help. I weep over the cost. Sometimes that gets into the glass, so there's that. There's a company that sells Islay water to make into ice cubes, should you want to go insane over this...
Try bourbons. You can find many of the same characteristics you enjoy in single malt (except peat) at half the price. Michters is a good distillery for the transition.

And try literally a drop or two of water. You'll be surprised.
 

qclabrat

Well-Known Member
#54
Good looking bourbon, great that you had that connection with your grandfather


My grandfather and I were close like father and son... So my grandmother got me this for as a Xmas present and said it was his favorite.

I was thinking shots of this stuff but apparently after some internet searching it meant to be sipped and enjoyed.
 

qclabrat

Well-Known Member
#56
only a few Islays are relatively affordable, there was one at Trader Joe's but I haven't seen it for some time. I've retired from drinking scotches, just the occasional dram to sip and reviews as such is my limit. Was up to about 50 bottles at one time, but that was when I stopped riding and just listening to tube radios.

I'm partial to Caol Ila. Peaty w/out the medicine-y kick of Laphroig (not that there's ANYTHING wrong with Laphroig).
View attachment 20309 Never saw the sense in adding water to it, though I know it's s'posed to help. I weep over the cost. Sometimes that gets into the glass, so there's that. There's a company that sells Islay water to make into ice cubes, should you want to go insane over this...
 

qclabrat

Well-Known Member
#57
I can't say I've had much experience with bourbon other than the regular Beam, Turkey and of course Jack. For the same reason I'm not a big fan of cognacs, I find them a bit too heavy and heady for me. Though I like the peat in scotch, my preferences draw more to the delicate palate.

is there such a thing as light or thin bourbon?


Try bourbons. You can find many of the same characteristics you enjoy in single malt (except peat) at half the price. Michters is a good distillery for the transition.

And try literally a drop or two of water. You'll be surprised.
 

jmanic

JORBA Board Member/Chapter Leader
Staff member
JORBA.ORG
Team MTBNJ Halter's
#58
is there such a thing as light or thin bourbon?
I'm not sure you're going to find anything like a Macallan 10 (aka breakfast whisky),
these are still bourbons after all.
I think the best you might do are something like a Michter's or Eagle Rare that my wife refers to as "lady whiskies".
Milder, but still bourbon.