1x10;Sram vrs. Shimano

Discussion in 'General Bike Talk' started by pooriggy, Jan 15, 2012.

  1. pooriggy

    pooriggy Well-Known Member Team MTBNJ Halter's

    Location:
    Cranford
    I am looing to go 1x10 on my mountain bike this year. I have a lot of questions. I think 11-36 will be fine for the rear cassette. What I need feed back on is

    What crank gearing?
    Sram x9 or Shimano xt...or other model?


    This if for my Cannondale Al. Flash. I want to switch to go simpler, lighter and hopefully be faster. Let me hear from you guys running 1x10...Thanks.
     
  2. goldsbar

    goldsbar New Member

    Location:
    NJ
    I run a 32 in the front and a 12(?)-36 in the rear. All SRAM except the SLX cranks. A 32T front is the lowest you can go easily. There are small manufacturers making 31T and even 30T middle rings but they require some filing of the crank spider. Another option is a spiderless crank (I believe many SRAM cranks have removable spiders). In theory, you can use just about any size ring with this option. In practice, companies still make a 32T minimum.

    In any case, with a 32T and 12/36T rear, I never run out of gear on a real trail. It is possible for short spurts on crushed gravel roads and of course pavement but that's not what I have a mountain bike for. I do at times wish for a 30T front in places like Allamuchy but it's not a big deal.

    Don't forget a bash guard and some sort of chain catcher on the inside to prevent the chain from popping off.

    Is it simpler and lighter? Certainly simpler and worth it for that IMO. The amount of weight you save isn't going to make any difference.
     
  3. pooriggy

    pooriggy Well-Known Member Team MTBNJ Halter's

    Location:
    Cranford
    I like the idea of a 30t front. This is the bike i use for endurance races. Courses with a lot of climbing it would be nice to have an easier gear to spin uphill as opposed to mashing and getting tired out.

    I thought the weight would be significant without the front shifter?
     
  4. ArmyOfNone

    ArmyOfNone New Member Team MTBNJ Halter's

    Location:
    Hillsborough
    If your thinking about endurance events and having an easier gear I would think the 1x set up may not be your best option. Sure its lighter but you when you have been beating up on yourself for hours, you should having the right selection of gears to help you finish.

    Coming from the guy who races a lot of endurance events.....................:rolleyes:
     
  5. Kirt

    Kirt JORBA: Chimney Rock, Team MTBNJ.COM JORBA.ORG Team MTBNJ Halter's

    Location:
    Central Jersey
    Couldn't agree more. The front won't be much of an issue if you don't' use it much, but will be there when you need it most.
     
  6. merritt

    merritt Member

    Location:
    central nj
    +1 for shimano.....I had shimano for 16yrs so i may be partial, and now have been using sram for about 2 months, sram isnt bad but it isnt shimano either
     
  7. MikeP

    MikeP Active Member

    Location:
    Sicklerville
    On my Misfit 29er I run a 28T front with a SRAM 1070 12-36 cassette (10 speed), SLX cranks, XT RD and shifter, Race face bash guard and N-stop cahin guide. Great set up for me. Had X7 RD and shifter on bike, more comfortable with Shimano. My X7 stuff is in the Bit&Pieces section for sale if anybody is looking for used parts cheap.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2012
  8. Fogerson

    Fogerson Former Resident Nerd

    Location:
    Portland OR
    The 1x10 setup on my Jet9 works pretty well.

    SRAM PG1070 11-36, X9 trigger shifter, X9 medium cage RD, jump stop, 34T SS qrotor chainring, race face bash and (newly) Biocon v.02 chain guide.

    For me personally, no lower gearing is required--and I'm fat and out of shape. Anything lower than 34-36, I'm probably gonna' move faster walking anyway. And with the 34-11, I can zip along in the 20's on the flat...

    Originally, I was going to go with a mrp bash/guide unit, but it wouldn't clear the lower links on the jet9.

    Then I had a modified kedge cross chain catcher on it, but alas, I found that sticks would get stuck in it and bend the light weight aluminum bracket. Hence the jump stop now. Honestly, I don't even know if I really need a guard...especially with the SS ring.

    I went with a medium cage RD because I figure that I might want to go 2x10 when I get to Oregon. The Cascades are big.

    I just put on a just released biocon v.02 chain guide. Not 100% thrilled on how it mounts to the swing arm of the Jet9 (specifically), but it works as advertised. You don't need this for any bike; I got one because I'm an equipment whore AND I hate the noise made by the chain slapping around through the rocks (too much time on a SS, apparently)--this thing takes care of that quite well.
    [​IMG]
     
  9. jShort

    jShort Well-Known Member Team MTBNJ Halter's

    Location:
    Glen Gardner
    I've been almost exclusively 1x9 for 2 years and with a 32 in the front and a 36 in the back, you are in a really low gear.

    I have a 32 front and 34 in the back on my full sus sultan and I'm never looking for an easier gear. And thats on a 28lb bike.

    Your lighter and faster than me so I think you should easily be ok with a 32 front.


    PS - my E13 chainguide has been flawless where the mrp has failed me 2 or 3 times. The mrps crack way too easily. Vreeland will concur
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2012
  10. stb222

    stb222 Love Drunk Jerk Squad

    Location:
    Jerksville
    I have 1 x 10 xt. 34 by 11 x 36 is the only think I have run and used it at mooch madness and the baldpate to water company trail no-so-epic ride. 34 x36 is really low and you are lighter and stronger than myself with a bike that is easily 5 lbs lighter.

    I don't know how the numbers work out with the team prices, but shimano can be had for much, much cheaper after market.
     
  11. Norm

    Norm Mayor McCheese Team MTBNJ Halter's

    Location:
    Warren
    I don't like 1x9/10 because you don't get the full range of top end. This applies for both MTB and CX bike. I don't buy into the 1x mindset at all. Well, unless the 1 in front is the big pie plate then you're talking.
     
  12. map111158

    map111158 Active Member Team MTBNJ Halter's

    Location:
    Paramus
    Here's another vote against the 1x setup for you. Riding with you as much as I do I know your style and it includes a lot of high cadence. You use that bike everywhere and for all types of events; you'll regret not having that little ring on mile 40 of bearscat. 1x10 setups are not for everyone and are geared more towards XC. Or you could just suck it up on the climbs its not like we live in the Alps :p

    If you insist on doing it, you'll be fine with a 32 and 11-36. What cranks do you have now? I believe the bike had a Shimano triple? If you want to try a 1x10 just use your current cranks. Buy a single speed specific chainring (make sure the bcd is the same as your cranks). Im with Jeremy, skip the mrp and go with the e.13. They make a nice clamp mounted chain guide that is much more solid than any of mrp's offerings (Ive tried and broken everything out there tho). Also, if you decide to do it make sure you shorten your chain significantly.
     
  13. pearl

    pearl Well-Known Member Team MTBNJ Halter's

    Location:
    mr wonderful
    X2 against 1x. More than anything, I like the smaller front ring to catch my chain :)
     
  14. ChrisRU

    ChrisRU Well-Known Member Team MTBNJ Halter's

    Location:
    Lincoln Park
    This.

    And this. And what others have said. I got rid of my 1x9 and went back to a triple because of endurance events. You simply don't get enough gear range for the variety of terrain you'll see, especially if you venture out of NJ.

    If you must go 1x, go bigger up front, not smaller. 32 at the minimum, 33/34 would probably be better. On the longer courses I think being able to haul ass on the flats/fireroads/extended downhills makes up for some of the small short steeps you might not have a low enough gear for.
     
  15. stb222

    stb222 Love Drunk Jerk Squad

    Location:
    Jerksville
    So why is it that most downhill bikes run a 36 x 11 as the top gear? These guys are going far faster than any of us. How often are you really using the big ring, 11, 12, 13, 14? Because if you are using them the majority of the time, you can do without them with a higher cadenace.

    Also, did you fall out of contention in a cross race this year for a mis shift that resulted in a broken chain? less gears equals less chance of a mechanical happening because of those reasons.

    It is the same appeal as ss, for simplicity and to a lesser degree weight. There is so much overlap in the gear ratio that you don't loose that much, hence the recent shift from 3 x 9 to 2 x 10. Yeah, you loose some top end, but how often are you really using them?
     
  16. ChrisRU

    ChrisRU Well-Known Member Team MTBNJ Halter's

    Location:
    Lincoln Park
    While most of what you said makes sounds great in theory, in practice the extra gears are the right call for most people. Your body goes through some crazy stuff during 50 mile/6 hour races, and sometimes its just as simple as being on the verge of death and needing to spin out for a while, or a burst of energy where mashing a 44x11 just feels right.
     
  17. jimvreeland

    jimvreeland Shop: Hilltop Bicycles Shop Keep

    Location:
    Piscataway, NJ
    I'm a 1x fan. And a Shimano fan. Agree with Jeremy, E13 is the way to go, seat-tube mounted one, lord knows how many MRPs I've cracked or bent along the way. Also agree about the higher end instead of the lower end. I run a single 38 up front with and 11-36 in the back. Even riding downhill on the road it's impossible to spin out a 38x11. If you're in the mindset that you a 44t on a 29er, you're smoking crack, and we need to ride, I'd love to see someone push that combo. The gear inches are about the same as spinning out a 56x11 on a road bike. Even Fabien Cancellara only runs a 55T.

    -Jim.
     
  18. gtluke

    gtluke The Moped Team MTBNJ Halter's

    Location:
    Two Bridges
    how about those ratcheting shimano rear derailures jim? they out yet? they work good enough to not need any retention on the front?
     
  19. jimvreeland

    jimvreeland Shop: Hilltop Bicycles Shop Keep

    Location:
    Piscataway, NJ
    They're out. You still need a guide up front. The tension of that Shimano cage is about the same as a stock Sram rear derailleur. FYI.

    -Jim.
     
  20. jShort

    jShort Well-Known Member Team MTBNJ Halter's

    Location:
    Glen Gardner
    In xt? Or only xtr?
     

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